Jump to content

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Seraphim

Training Season and Off Season

Recommended Posts

Hi Guys, This is my first post here and not sure if this is the right category to put this question, if not then moderators please help me move it. 

So the question is, in a calendar year:

1. What is the breakdown, in terms of weeks, in a training season for a race (not sure what this is called...training or race season) and  Off season? (e.g. 6 months training from Jan to June and then off seasons are from July to December)

2. What kind of running regime or how hard should one usually train in an off season?

 

Thanks in advance guys...hopefully my question is not that confusing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Seraphim said:

Hi Guys, This is my first post here and not sure if this is the right category to put this question, if not then moderators please help me move it. 

So the question is, in a calendar year:

1. What is the breakdown, in terms of weeks, in a training season for a race (not sure what this is called...training or race season) and  Off season? (e.g. 6 months training from Jan to June and then off seasons are from July to December)

2. What kind of running regime or how hard should one usually train in an off season?

 

Thanks in advance guys...hopefully my question is not that confusing. 

Hi! Welcome to the forum and I do my best to answer your question without too much technical jargon.

My guess is that you are referring to the running training phases broken into different cycles? This concept is called periodization and this Runner's World article (click link here) explains quite well here.  For the breakdown, it depends on the person if weeks or months are chosen instead.

For your second question how one trains during off season (for running context, little or no key run events), the focus is more on body maintenance such as strength/resistance training (neglected by runners) and resume running base building phase.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, trailblazer said:

Hi! Welcome to the forum and I do my best to answer your question without too much technical jargon.

My guess is that you are referring to the running training phases broken into different cycles? This concept is called periodization and this Runner's World article (click link here) explains quite well here.  For the breakdown, it depends on the person if weeks or months are chosen instead.

For your second question how one trains during off season (for running context, little or no key run events), the focus is more on body maintenance such as strength/resistance training (neglected by runners) and resume running base building phase.

Thanks! I think there is alot to digest in that article...does that mean that 16-20 weeks is the training period in a year? and then the rest is off season and just concentrate on base building phase? kinda little confused here...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Seraphim said:

Hi Guys, This is my first post here and not sure if this is the right category to put this question, if not then moderators please help me move it. 

So the question is, in a calendar year:

1. What is the breakdown, in terms of weeks, in a training season for a race (not sure what this is called...training or race season) and  Off season? (e.g. 6 months training from Jan to June and then off seasons are from July to December)

2. What kind of running regime or how hard should one usually train in an off season?

 

Thanks in advance guys...hopefully my question is not that confusing. 

Hi Seraphim, Welcome to the forum and most importantly, you made a good choice to take up running as a healthy lifestyle regime...

1) Apart from the article shared by @trailblazer on the different types of training, of course different races require different duration depending on many factors such as the distance of the race, the fitness level one is at, the race goal, etc to name a few. For eg: training for a 10km race to hit sub 40mins is very different from training to complete a Full Marathon. Usually the "training season" is the period where you train for the race and "off season" is when you are just maintaining your current fitness as much as possible.

2) Again there is no hard and fast rule for this. From what I heard from other runners, off season would usually means easy running most of the time. Once a while can throw in faster pace running such as intervals or longer distance running just for variation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the encouragement. If that's the case then usually how many half marathon or marathon should one do ideally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Seraphim said:

Thank you for the encouragement. If that's the case then usually how many half marathon or marathon should one do ideally?

again there is no hard and fast rule... to each his own.... some run for health benefit and dun even take up 10km run... many run for different purpose so there is really no answer to this... the only suggestion I read before is to run only 2 Full Marathons in a year so that there is adequate time for training and recovery but once again, it depends on individual..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎17‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 6:16 PM, AutumnRunner said:

again there is no hard and fast rule... to each his own.... some run for health benefit and dun even take up 10km run... many run for different purpose so there is really no answer to this... the only suggestion I read before is to run only 2 Full Marathons in a year so that there is adequate time for training and recovery but once again, it depends on individual..

To add on what @AutumnRunner mentioned, I do have friends who do not take part in any paid running events but enjoy doing their own runs, so long the main objective is to stay healthy, keep oneself fit.

For the number of run events to do(be it 10km,half or full marathons), it is really dependent on your running aerobic base and recovery speed. If your fitness base is well developed, you can do a few half marathons as build up events before doing full marathons for the year. So no hard and fast rule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎17‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 11:21 AM, Seraphim said:

Thanks! I think there is alot to digest in that article...does that mean that 16-20 weeks is the training period in a year? and then the rest is off season and just concentrate on base building phase? kinda little confused here...

16-20 weeks period is more towards properly training for a full marathon and finishing it comfortably. Yes, off season is just simply no key running events for you and to concentrate on fitness base building. Hope this clarifies. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎17‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 5:57 PM, Seraphim said:

Thank you for the encouragement. If that's the case then usually how many half marathon or marathon should one do ideally?

and also not forgetting that there are extremes elites who do half and full marathons day in day out....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, AutumnRunner said:

and also not forgetting that there are extremes elites who do half and full marathons day in day out....

How they maintain their energy level? I do a half need to rest for a week , do a full need to rest for 2 week. Felt tired after a long run and it can drag on for the whole day unless I manage to get a nap. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, mover said:

How they maintain their energy level? I do a half need to rest for a week , do a full need to rest for 2 week. Felt tired after a long run and it can drag on for the whole day unless I manage to get a nap. 

unsure as well cause I am not one of them... :lol: ... I guess their body is just so efficient that the half/full marathon requires much lesser time to recuperate than most of us..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 17/05/2017 at 10:19 AM, Seraphim said:

Hi Guys, This is my first post here and not sure if this is the right category to put this question, if not then moderators please help me move it. 

So the question is, in a calendar year:

1. What is the breakdown, in terms of weeks, in a training season for a race (not sure what this is called...training or race season) and  Off season? (e.g. 6 months training from Jan to June and then off seasons are from July to December)

2. What kind of running regime or how hard should one usually train in an off season?

 

Thanks in advance guys...hopefully my question is not that confusing. 

1. Depends what is/are your key event(s). Then you work backwards from there. If I use a marathon (i.e., Stand Chart), I would allocate about 8 months of preparation. About 3 - 3.5 months before the race, I will usually advise one to do a half-marathon to give you a clearer idea if your desired marathon race time is feasible. And probably a 10km time trial every 8-10 weeks (can be a 10k race or your self-timed run) for you to recalibrate your training zones if necessary.

2. Generally, expect a slight dip in your fitness level during the off season period as you reduce or cease your high intensity sessions (i.e., intervals). You can probably play with a few sessions of Fartlek so that your legs wont feel rusty from the lack of speed. The typical problem encountered during off season is actually weight gain. As the runner tapers off his running volume, he needs to match it with a reduction in food too. So make sure you are not eating the same amount of food as you did during in-season. Off-season is also a good time to visit a sports physio to do a prerehabilitation check on your strength, flexibility and balance. Its good to iron out little issues here & there before you start to up your volume/intensity. These little foxes might just be the next cause of injury.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×