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jerrylam

Training and Preparing For Ultra Marathons

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14 hours ago, Lexham said:

One painful lesson I learned very quickly from trail ultras is you should incorporate hill repeats or stairs training in your training regime so that your legs can get used to all the climbing. 

Always study the elevation profile of your race and tailor your training accordingly. It is not enough to just clock mileage.. if possible, must try to run on the same terrain. 

 

The key take away from @Lexham's reply here is "Always study the elevation profile of your race and tailor your training accordingly."

One can train mostly in the hills, and get through a flat race comfortably. But if one trains mostly on flat roads, he'll be in for a rude shock at a hilly race. I learned this lesson the painful way as Lexham did. 

I just finished one FM and one mini-ultra over the last 30 days. So i assumed doing 1 loop at MR last Sunday should be 'no problem'. I was wrong! The quads were totally unprepared for the constant sharp uphill and downhill as they've been underutilized for so long. I was short of breath, and felt tight at the quads even before reaching the ranger's station. Instead of continuous running throughout the trail as i thought i could, i had to jog/walk all the way. It was definitely far from comfortable.

Most runners don't like intervals and hills training (myself included). They are painful, tough, torturous and make you wanna puke your lungs out. But they are essential for further improvements on both timing and distance. 

 

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I read this article on Hills Training which i think could be useful for our training. Just in case you're too busy to read through the whole article, the article focuses on 2 types of hills training: short hill repeats and long sustained hills. 

SHORT HILL REPEATS

Short hill repeats are the bread and butter of most training programs. They should be done throughout the base or building phase, and then revisited periodically as you progress towards race day. These repeats will help you with longer ascents.

Find a hill with a medium slope (six to 10 percent) that takes 45–90 seconds to ascend.  Run up at an effort equivalent to your mile race effort—this will ultimately equate to roughly 5K pace as you ascend the hill. Focus on good form with powerful push off and strong arm swing. Slowly jog down the hill to recover. Depending on your fitness level, do six to 15 repeats. If you find that you still lack significant uphill drive even after doing short hill repeats for a few months, then steep hill repeats might be the way to go. They aren’t as long (only 15–30 seconds), but the hill is much steeper. These really develop power in the legs. 

LONG SUSTAINED HILLS

To run a sustained hill workout, find a trail or road that ascends for several km and ideally gains between 100 – 300m per 1 - 2km. Cover a total of 6 - 20km of uphill running miles, steadily increasing your intensity as you approach the end of the session.  Depending on the length of the climb, try to sustain half marathon to marathon pace effort. If you need to repeat the same hill several times, then do so. Recover as you jog back to the bottom. This is a challenging workout and will likely leave you heavily fatigued. Repeat it several times during a season and track your fitness progression.

http://www.runnersworld.com/rt-web-exclusive/mastering-hills-part-i-climbs

My legs already feel jelly by reading it...but i'm sure it's gonna worth the efforts.

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I agree with @jerrylam that this is definitely one of the most dreaded training sessions of all and I am one of those who always miss this training with one excuse over another... haha....

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I signed up yesterday for the Garang Warrior Ultra which will happen on 20th May 2017. It was a spur of the moment decision when i saw someone giving up their bib for sale. As i have no upcoming races in both May and June, i decided to take over the slot as part of my training for MSIG AA 50km in July, and also keeping up the mileage for Craze Ultra.

From now until August, i hope to be able to run at least one ultra distance or a long run exceeding 40km each month to keep the momentum. My schedule from now until Craze Ultra is as below:

May: Garang Warrior Ultra (target 60-70km)

June: Self LSD training (target 40 - 50km)

July: MSIG Action Asia 50km

No amount of LSD or physical training will be enough to prepare a person for a 100 miles, in my opinion. Just wanna get my body seasoned to the physical torture as best as i could. 

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3 hours ago, AutumnRunner said:

Why u never put the Sept schedule for Craze Ultra? I am sure it will be more complete..

Craze Ultra is 12 - 13 August this year...so my plan is to build up mileage towards it over the next 3 months.

Edited by jerrylam

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8 hours ago, jerrylam said:

Craze Ultra is 12 - 13 August this year...so my plan is to build up mileage towards it over the next 3 months.

ok. I help you add then... Jerry's Ultra plan for the next few months... :good:

May: Garang Warrior Ultra (target 60-70km)

June: Self LSD training (target 40 - 50km)

July: MSIG Action Asia 50km

August: Craze Ultra 100 Miles

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Jin emo!!!! I bought a last minute Garang Warrior Ultra slot from another runner who can't make it for the race, only for myself to also can't make it this Sat due to an urgent family matter which my wife has to attend to....so i need to be babysitter for my sons at home :cray:. Reluctantly sold off my slot on the cheap to another runner.......

So i'll probably do a LSD on Sunday morning.....jin emo!!!!!! 

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On ‎19‎/‎5‎/‎2017 at 5:44 PM, jerrylam said:

Jin emo!!!! I bought a last minute Garang Warrior Ultra slot from another runner who can't make it for the race, only for myself to also can't make it this Sat due to an urgent family matter which my wife has to attend to....so i need to be babysitter for my sons at home :cray:. Reluctantly sold off my slot on the cheap to another runner.......

So i'll probably do a LSD on Sunday morning.....jin emo!!!!!! 

there is always another race bro...

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14 minutes ago, AutumnRunner said:

there is always another race bro...

I know, but just felt emo as i was so looking forward to this race which i'll be doing for the first time. I only did a 21km late last night to end the weekend and not let it go to waste.

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3 hours ago, jerrylam said:

I know, but just felt emo as i was so looking forward to this race which i'll be doing for the first time. I only did a 21km late last night to end the weekend and not let it go to waste.

understand fully how u feel... just use this strength and motivation to knock off minutes off your next Ultra ba... in CU....

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Guys..i been trying to run a bit more and i notice that my immune system suffered. Meaning i would fall sick rather easily, is this the case and how u all overcome this? I do not wish to take MC as work still comes first to support the family...

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28 minutes ago, AdiZero said:

Guys..i been trying to run a bit more and i notice that my immune system suffered. Meaning i would fall sick rather easily, is this the case and how u all overcome this? I do not wish to take MC as work still comes first to support the family...

I would believe that your immune system suffers not due to running but perhaps the weather.. and maybe your way of introducing "more running" is not in order thus it caused your entire health to be affected... there are too many factors involved...

For now, get your health back to 100% first before going back to running...

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On 5/30/2017 at 9:00 AM, AdiZero said:

Guys..i been trying to run a bit more and i notice that my immune system suffered. Meaning i would fall sick rather easily, is this the case and how u all overcome this? I do not wish to take MC as work still comes first to support the family...

Happens to me too when i pushed myself too hard. Only way is to keep loading myself up with Vit C. Does help to reduce occurrence of flu and sickness after long runs and hard training. 

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On 5/29/2017 at 6:14 PM, Lexham said:

Time is precious commodity .... especially if you have to train for that ultra, find time to keep your loved ones happy and not forgetting your day job!

Article from Asia Trail Mag on how to train effectively for an ultra...

http://asiatrailmag.com/successfully-finish-ultra-10h-training-week/

I like this article! Makes a lot of sense especially to most of us that has a hectic schedule balancing work, family, social and our hobby of running. How to train 160km or 20 hours a week?? Definitely impossible for me with my current schedule. Just as the article suggested, i prioritize quality over quantity in terms of training. Currently, i try to run 3 times a week if i can (otherwise twice). 1 hill training session, 1 recovery run and 1 LSD over the weekend. On days which i'm not running, i do some core strengthening workouts at home. So far its working well for me, and i intend to keep it this way. 

Thanks for sharing @Lexham!

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Thanks for sharing the article, to me going for run is'nt hard, i mean i am the type that does'nt need to be motivated and can go run by myself but just that the falling sick portion, i noticed that i am always the 1st person to get flu especially after clocking lots of mileage. I read some articles about long mileage do cause a wreck on your immune system, its not the weather, Singapore 365 days almost the same weather, i think is the long hours of running. I needed more advise from experts on how to solve or cure this "falling sick" problem. Do all bros here also fall sick easily among their colleagues ? Any remedy for this ?

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5 hours ago, AdiZero said:

Thanks for sharing the article, to me going for run is'nt hard, i mean i am the type that does'nt need to be motivated and can go run by myself but just that the falling sick portion, i noticed that i am always the 1st person to get flu especially after clocking lots of mileage. I read some articles about long mileage do cause a wreck on your immune system, its not the weather, Singapore 365 days almost the same weather, i think is the long hours of running. I needed more advise from experts on how to solve or cure this "falling sick" problem. Do all bros here also fall sick easily among their colleagues ? Any remedy for this ?

"After clocking lots of mileage" ---> There you go. In a nut shell, doing endurance sports can strengthen one's immune system in the long run. But in the short term, its temporarily weakened as the body enters a state of shock due to the huge amount of free radicals and stress hormones (i.e., cortisol) produced after each bout of physical stress (per run). Balancing it with sufficient recovery / rest will bring the "shock" back to normal. Often, when you are clocking high volume of mileage and still only taking the same amount of rest as per your normal running volume days, chances are your body won't be able to recover from a "state of shock" fast enough and as you persist in doing the next run, you are actually training in a fatigue state. Also bear in mind that in reality many other types of stress (work, emotional disturbances etc) can affect your recovery rate too.

The best advice I can give you is to try to identify at what range of mileage will the flu-like symptoms set in; that's what I call your "resistance point" or "wall". From there, drop the weekly mileage by about 20% and maintain that volume for another 2-4 weeks. You can maintain your intensity but if the higher intensity runs begin to feel like a drag (i.e., the perceived exertion on a 1-10 scale is higher despite running the same speed), call off all the higher intensity runs. What Im hoping to achieve here is to give your body more time to adapt to the current stress before progressively overloading it again.

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12 hours ago, AdiZero said:

Thanks for sharing the article, to me going for run is'nt hard, i mean i am the type that does'nt need to be motivated and can go run by myself but just that the falling sick portion, i noticed that i am always the 1st person to get flu especially after clocking lots of mileage. I read some articles about long mileage do cause a wreck on your immune system, its not the weather, Singapore 365 days almost the same weather, i think is the long hours of running. I needed more advise from experts on how to solve or cure this "falling sick" problem. Do all bros here also fall sick easily among their colleagues ? Any remedy for this ?

For me, long runs definitely can cause some damage to immune system thus right after my long runs, as much as possible, I try to avoid going crowded places in a confined space.. example air-con class room or movie theatre where germs and bacteria can spread fast from people around you... this weakened immune system of course is temporary and a stronger immune system awaits you in the longer term as everyone knows running aka exercising improves health....

One good way is to run the LSD run on Sat morning so that you can have 2 full days of weekend to rest and recover before going back to office where it's another crowded air-con area with potential germs flying around...

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Since this is an Ultra-marathon thread, here's a paper I wrote recently that looked at the training needed to finish a 100-mile race. I opted to have it published on an open access journal so that the article can be viewed / downloaded FOC. Just click on the "Download" box on the upper right corner near the tittle. 

Click HERE for the link. 

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17 hours ago, philip said:

Since this is an Ultra-marathon thread, here's a paper I wrote recently that looked at the training needed to finish a 100-mile race. I opted to have it published on an open access journal so that the article can be viewed / downloaded FOC. Just click on the "Download" box on the upper right corner near the tittle. 

Click HERE for the link. 

Awesome!! Thanks and greatly appreciate that!! Just what i need for inspiration, motivation and also new ideas for training as i prepare for my maiden 100 miles in Aug :thumbsu:

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On 6/5/2017 at 5:57 PM, philip said:

Since this is an Ultra-marathon thread, here's a paper I wrote recently that looked at the training needed to finish a 100-mile race. I opted to have it published on an open access journal so that the article can be viewed / downloaded FOC. Just click on the "Download" box on the upper right corner near the tittle. 

Click HERE for the link. 

Thanks. the X-training (19.3 ± 27.9) is per week? meaning an average of 3hr ± 4hr everyday? 

Edited by simonleng

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