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Standard Chartered Marathon Singapore - 2-3 Dec 2017

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10 hours ago, AutumnRunner said:

I read that the medal design is out.... it's a totally new shape as compared to previous year's editions of circular and rectangular... The Singapore Island shape is a fresh new look! There is colour on it so, let's see if it's gonna be ELM this year...

New medal design for Stanchart S’pore Marathon 2017

Source: http://www.todayonline.com/sports/new-medal-design-stanchart-spore-marathon-2017

This year's medal is indeed totally different and unique from all the rest.

Don't think it will be very Big.

Should be around the similar size of others.

Let's hope for quality medal then it would be great

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7 hours ago, beast said:

"This time I will" - Is this supposed to be this year's tagline or something?

 

So when will the next update be? :ph34r:

Ok, this year I will do it...

1 hour ago, sivakumar said:

Thanks for the update of the previous years medals

No problem since I have all the medals... haa

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Another 'bottle opener' medal.

What's with the trend as unlike my young days, not that much soft drink in glass bottles (although increasing trend of bottled drinks in recent times!)

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6 hours ago, kcslchin said:

Another 'bottle opener' medal.

What's with the trend as unlike my young days, not that much soft drink in glass bottles (although increasing trend of bottled drinks in recent times!)

It's for beer bottles.

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1 hour ago, jerrylam said:

These days, marathoners all lim beer, no more soft drinks LOL

Maybe they need to create isotonic drinks in bottles so runners can make use of the medals new ability...haa...

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For myself, except for the German beer Hoegaarden, all the other beer I have at home at in cans. 

If you drink beer in coffee shops, got someone to open the beer bottle for u ^_^

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12 hours ago, kcslchin said:

For myself, except for the German beer Hoegaarden, all the other beer I have at home at in cans. 

If you drink beer in coffee shops, got someone to open the beer bottle for u ^_^

Maybe you can stop them before they open the bottle and take out your medal!!! hahah..... think might end up in Stomp...haha

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4 hours ago, AutumnRunner said:

Maybe you can stop them before they open the bottle and take out your medal!!! hahah..... think might end up in Stomp...haha

won't bring my 'precious' but weird looking medal to coffee shop to open beer bottle. :lol::lol:

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Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, kcslchin said:

For myself, except for the German beer Hoegaarden, all the other beer I have at home at in cans. 

If you drink beer in coffee shops, got someone to open the beer bottle for u ^_^

Spoken like a real beer drinking veteran...satki!

Edited by jerrylam

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On 7/1/2017 at 6:55 PM, jerrylam said:

Spoken like a real beer drinking veteran...satki!

*paiseh, paiseh* 

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25 minutes ago, prisangel said:

SCSM Official Training Kick-Off started this morning at the Singapore Sports Hub.

Here's what happened today, and also more on what you can look forward to if you head on down tomorrow.

http://www.prischew.com/sports/running/the-scsm-training-kick-off-begins-my-heart-rate-run/

Thanks, Pris. 

For rough estimate of max heart rate, I think you meant 220 minus age, rather than 180 minus age.

 

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Posted (edited)

Let me explain briefly since I am also using the 180 formula HR training by Dr. Phil Maffetone from last year and still in the progress of base building here. Source: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ If you want the actual book,  please check it out in public libraries or get it online at  https://www.bookdepository.com/The-Big-Book-of-Endurance-Training-and-Racing-Dr-Philip-Maffetone/9781616080655

For the well known max heart rate estimation at 220-age, its biggest limitation comes from the fact it overstates the heart rate of training zones, leading to burnout/injuries/poor running form etc. Remember that running long distance is aerobic (use of oxygen) while only for sprints then you will be anaerobic (not using oxygen). I am not sure if the heart rate training session covered this, but it is not strictly just 180 - age as adjustments need to be made to calculate the true aerobic training zone. Please see the below from the source weblink from Maffetone website for the exact wordings:

Quote

This “180 Formula” enables athletes to find the ideal maximum aerobic heart rate in which to base all aerobic training. When exceeded, this number indicates a rapid transition towards anaerobic work.


A good aerobic base isn’t important only for endurance athletes. The system that controls the body’s stress response is functionally linked to the anaerobic system. In other words, if you depend too much on your anaerobic system, you’ll be more stressed, and therefore more likely to overtrain or become injured. I discuss these topics more in depth in The MAF Test and in The New Aerobic Revolution.

The 180 Formula
To find your maximum aerobic training heart rate, there are two important steps.

Subtract your age from 180.
Modify this number by selecting among the following categories the one that best matches your fitness and health profile:

a)  If you have or are recovering from a major illness (heart disease, any operation or hospital stay, etc.) or are on any regular medication, subtract an additional 10.

b )  If you are injured, have regressed in training or competition, get more than two colds or bouts of flu per year, have allergies or asthma, or if you have been inconsistent or are just getting back into training, subtract an additional 5. 

c)  If you have been training consistently (at least four times weekly) for up to two years without any of the problems in (a) and (b), keep the number (180–age) the same.

d)  If you have been training for more than two years without any of the problems in (a) and (b), and have made progress in competition without injury, add 5.

For example, if you are 30 years old and fit into category (b), you get the following: 180–30=150. Then 150–5=145 beats per minute (bpm).
In this example, 145 must be the highest heart rate for all training. This allows you to most efficiently build an aerobic base. Training above this heart rate rapidly incorporates anaerobic function, exemplified by a shift to burning more sugar and less fat for fuel.

Initially, training at this relatively low rate may be difficult for some athletes. “I just can’t train that slowly!” is a common comment. But after a short time, you will feel better and your pace will quicken at that same heart rate. You will not be stuck training at that relatively slow pace for too long. Still, for many athletes, it is difficult to change bad habits.

If it is difficult to decide which of two groups best fits you, choose the group or outcome that results in the lower heart rate. In athletes who are taking medication that may affect their heart rate, wear a pacemaker, or have special circumstances not discussed here, further consultation with a healthcare practitioner or specialist may be necessary, particularly one familiar with the 180 Formula.

Exemptions:
The 180 Formula may need to be further individualized for people over the age of 65. For some of these athletes, up to 10 beats may have to be added for those in category (d) in the 180 Formula, and depending on individual levels of fitness and health. This does not mean 10 should automatically be added, but that an honest self-assessment is important.

For athletes 16 years of age and under, the formula is not applicable; rather, a heart rate of 165 may be best.

Once a maximum aerobic heart rate is found, a training range from this heart rate to 10 beats below could be used. For example, if an athlete’s maximum aerobic heart rate is determined to be 155, that person’s aerobic training zone would be 145 to 155 bpm. However, the more training closer to the maximum 155, the quicker an optimal aerobic base will be developed.

3

 

Edited by trailblazer
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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, wonderfulblevic said:

Thanks, Pris. 

For rough estimate of max heart rate, I think you meant 220 minus age, rather than 180 minus age.

 

No. It's 180 minus age. 

Not 220 minus age.

Have asked Ben Pulham about this before. He says the 220 minus age formula is not as accurate, as his testing in his lab had showed.

By the way, it's maximum aerobic heart rate. Not maximum heart rate.

Maximum aerobic heart rate refers to the high end of your easy heart rate, where you will be able to hold a conversation during running.

More information here.

http://www.prischew.com/sports/running/coacheds-ben-pulham-many-runners-are-training-too-hard/

Edited by prisangel

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20 hours ago, trailblazer said:

Let me explain briefly since I am also using the 180 formula HR training by Dr. Phil Maffetone from last year and still in the progress of base building here. Source: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ If you want the actual book,  please check it out in public libraries or get it online at  https://www.bookdepository.com/The-Big-Book-of-Endurance-Training-and-Racing-Dr-Philip-Maffetone/9781616080655

For the well known max heart rate estimation at 220-age, its biggest limitation comes from the fact it overstates the heart rate of training zones, leading to burnout/injuries/poor running form etc. Remember that running long distance is aerobic (use of oxygen) while only for sprints then you will be anaerobic (not using oxygen). I am not sure if the heart rate training session covered this, but it is not strictly just 180 - age as adjustments need to be made to calculate the true aerobic training zone. Please see the below from the source weblink from Maffetone website for the exact wordings:

 

 

1 hour ago, prisangel said:

No. It's 180 minus age. 

Not 220 minus age.

Have asked Ben Pulham about this before. He says the 220 minus age formula is not as accurate, as his testing in his lab had showed.

By the way, it's maximum aerobic heart rate. Not maximum heart rate.

Maximum aerobic heart rate refers to the high end of your easy heart rate, where you will be able to hold a conversation during running.

More information here.

http://www.prischew.com/sports/running/coacheds-ben-pulham-many-runners-are-training-too-hard/

Thanks both for the explanations and additional info.  This concept is new to me, but it's an interesting one.

 

 

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On 29/06/2017 at 7:24 PM, sivakumar said:

This year's medal is indeed totally different and unique from all the rest.

Don't think it will be very Big.

Should be around the similar size of others.

Let's hope for quality medal then it would be great

Not so keen about this medal design.  

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Posted (edited)

It would be nice if they also mark the hydration points on the map. I guess they are probably still planning them. 

Edit: I was blind, they are marked already. However, they haven't indicate whether banana and gel will be provided along the route.

But I like the new route so far, no heartbreaking bridge.. Hehe

Edited by posfe2

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