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kohpapa

Running for the health and fitness: No Pain and Injury Free

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kohpapa   

Running is one of the the best cardio exercise which plays a very important role to maintain our health and fitness. 
It improves our fitness level. 
Increases the body strength and stamina. 
Prevents from various diseases such as blood pressure, heart problems, obesity, 
depression, and anxiety etc. 
It's fitness results for the long term.

 

Running...Health and Fitness...

Health means freedom from illness or injury, enabling a person to live normally and in comfort....and Fitness means the ability to expend a lot of energy (cellular and **neuro-musculoskeletal) efficiently...

**neuro-musculoskeletal - the interactions between nerves, muscles and the skeleton.

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Video: Be Inspired...Running

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Edited by kohpapa
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kohpapa   

Common Definitions of Fitness Components

Health-Related Components

Muscular Strength is the maximum amount of force that one can generate in a specific movement pattern at a specific velocity of contraction. The definition used to be more simple--the ability to lift a maximum weight. The new definition reflects more specificity in the nature of a movement where strength is required.

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When runners make significant strength gains, muscles fibers (cells) gain size. Weightlifting requires considerable strength, but all sports also require some level of strength fitness.

Muscular Endurance is the ability to sustain submaximal activity for extended periods of time and resist fatigue. Submaximal muscular endurance is the ability to sustain low-intensity muscular contractions for a period of time. High-intensity (strength) endurance reflects the ability to sustain high-intensity muscular contractions. 

Cardiovascular Endurance is the ability to perform prolonged aerobic exercise at moderate to high exercise intensities. It is related to the functioning of the lungs, heart, and circulatory system and the capacity of skeletal muscle to utilize oxygen. 

Flexibility is the ability of a joint to move freely through its range of motion (ROM). 

Body Composition is the proportion of fat and fat-free mass (lean body mass) throughout the body. Eating properly and engaging in physical activities are the most effective ways to enhance body composition. 
 

Skill-Related Components

Speed is the ability to perform a motor skill as rapidly as possible. Simply, it is the ability to move quickly, which is an essential quality in many sports. Reaction time is closely related to speed.

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Reaction time is the ability to respond rapidly to a stimulus (cue). Reaction time can be improved by explosive exercise and sport-specific practice. 

Agility is the ability to move change direction rapidly without a significant loss of speed, glance, or body control. Agility fitness combines power, strength, balance, flexibility, reaction time, coordination, anticipation, and muscular control. Ability is critical in any sport that requires rapid changes in direction, deceleration, and acceleration, such as athletics sprinting (running).

Power is ability to exert muscular strength rapidly. It is the rate of performing work. On the field, power combines speed and strength. Explosive skills require power fitness, which involves exerting force with marked acceleration. 

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Balance is the ability to maintain equilibrium. Balance can be static or dynamic. Static balance means that the athlete is not moving, such as when performing a handstand. Dynamic balance means that the athlete maintains equilibrium while moving, such as in ski events. 

Coordination is the ability to move smoothly and efficiently. It is specific to each sport skill. Gross motor coordination means performing large muscle skills, such as running and jumping, with good technique, rhythm, and accuracy.

Fitness Plan for Running

Yes, many recreational runners will always start to reach into Peak Performance stage ready for Running Race competition...with little/no knowledge of Structured Training Plan...which is important for next phase of optimal Fitness Plan...with different Health Benefits...

Some have decided that a form of fitness training must be designed to prepare one for the physical demands of recreational running with longer distance...others eventually will be gearing up with running competitions.. progressing 3km/5km/10km to 12km/16km21km then 32km/42km...

The benefits of structured physical training for runners will have to include:
* less fatigue and quicker recovery,
* reduced muscle soreness,
* ability to practice longer,
* fewer injuries and faster recover from them, and
* greater confidence. 

 

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kohpapa   

Exercise Zones in Age Group using Maximum Heart Rate

Hi, just contributing something on training for anything..running, or any sports exercise with moderation with emphasis on Weight Control, Aerobic, Anaerobic..to peak performance like VO2 Max.

Always a fundamental question for Newbie Runner who begins doubting.."It Always Seems Impossible to do a Marathon"...and months later..finally achieving.."I finally done a Marathon". How to explain the achievement in the process? Maybe, this can be explained.

Calculation of Maximum Heart Rate

First, we need to know something about Heart Rate in different age groups. The easiest and best known method to calculate your maximum heart rate (HRmax) is to use the formula : HRmax = 220 - Age. The mean peak heart rate for women = 206 - (0.88 x age).

How do you get your heart rate on target?

Using a Heart Rate Monitoring device, track fitness/aerobic/anaerobic/peak performance with the "Heart Rate-Running Exercise Zones". 

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Heart Rate Training Zones : Heart rate training zones are calculated by taking into consideration your Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) and your Resting Heart Rate (RHR). 
The zones are:

• Energy Efficient or Recovery (60-70%)
• Aerobic (70-8O%)
• Anaerobic (8O-90%)
• Red Line (90-100%)

Within each training zone, subtle physiological effects take place to enhance your fitness.

Interval Workout

Favourite Newbie's next question is, what is Interval Training or Workout? Simply, when planning or doing interval workout, what should he/she be doing to try to maintain his/her target zone heart rate during the entire interval (training/workout), average it over the interval or reach it as a peak during the interval? Actually, the process of interval training/workout leads to a Training Plan. 

For example, taking a reccommended "Army Half-Marathon [AHM] Run Training Plan":

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Yes, to achieve a peak performance of AHM Run on the race day, sufficient time and preparation is needed, in phases. Phase 1: Foundation, Phase 2: Multi-Terrain or with Cross-Training, Phase 3: Phase 1 & 2 Combo with Trial Run 5km/10km/15km.

Hope this explains..10km..Half Marathon..Full-Marathon..or Ultra-Distance.."It Always is Possible if It's Done"..that is, only through a proper thought-out Training Plan. 

Of course, do "All Things Possible with Moderation", that is, don't overtrain, and yes, always have an Injury Management Plan for Rest and Recovery.

 

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kohpapa   

Of course, some may want to use Exercise Zones in Run Intensity for Fat Oxidation...

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Yes, runners will need a training plan...determined from your running needs analysis...

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do "All Things Possible with Moderation"...and of course, don't overtrain...

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and...stick on to the plan...

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Alternate with cross-training program... anything Sports that is non-running but have fitness and health benefits just like running... such as swimming, cycling, skating, canoeing...

Importantly, balance running with lifelong pursuits in education/career, family, personal passion, spiritual/secular interests with healthy well-being and consideration (like asthma or diabetic)...

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kohpapa   

A Runner's Must Know...

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Vs...

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What's You love about...Running...

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Always Checkout Health Concerns...Injuries and Causes...

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Anterior Pelvic Tilt: when the pelvis rotates anteriorly around the hip joint along a transverse axis. This creates excessive hip flexion and an excessive loordosis at the lumbar spine in a static posture.

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Causes of Anterior Pelvic Tilt: The musculoskeletal causes are outlined below:

1. Rectus abdominis weakness.
2. Poor flexibility of the hip flexors (predominately the illiopsoas).
3. Increased tone and shortened length of the lower back extensors (erector spinae muscles).
4. Excessive length and weakness of the hip extensors- (hamstrings).
5. Inhibited, weak gluteal muscles.

Poor Flexibility of the Hip Flexors: This is the most common cause of anterior pelvic tilt predicated by our constant sitting in chairs which places the hip flexors at a shortened position. Stretching of these muscles is important. 

Increased tone and shortened length of back extensors: Overactivity of the lower back muscles is extremely common, especially in those who have a history of lower back pain. 

 

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How Yoga Addresses Running Imbalances

"A good yoga practice involves equal movements on both sides, making it easy to identify imbalances & weaknesses, and correct them. A runner who has no problem holding Warrior Pose on the left, but struggles with it one right, obviously has some work to do on the right. "

Warrior Pose are great Yoga leg stretches for runners.. work for both left and right..which will strengthen and stretch your legs, vital to running injury free ... 

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Yoga Uses Opposing Movements

"Yoga is also ideal because many runners neglect to practice opposing movements. Much of running involves the contraction of muscles, with little of the opposite movement—the elongation the muscles. This leads to very tight, brittle, injury-prone muscles."

"The hip flexors are a great example of this: when running, the hip flexors are constantly contracting to bring the leg up with each step, but little attention is paid to the opposite movement—the extension. Yoga can address this problem of tight or brittle muscles from too much contraction and not enough elongation."

Poor Flexibility of the Hip Flexors: This is the most common cause of anterior pelvic tilt predicated by our constant sitting in chairs which places the hip flexors at a shortened position. Stretching of these muscles is important. This can be performed with Yoga Pigeon Pose or in a kneeling hip flexor stretch 

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or through a yoga Bridge Pose that extends, or open the front of the hip stretch the hip flexors, strengthening and lengthening them.
 

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Hydration and Nutrition...

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How Yellow is your Pee? Dark yellow = dehydrated; Light yellow = adequately hydrated.

How much volume have you peed out? Small amounts that are dark yellow = dehydrated. Large amounts that are light yellow = adequately hydrated.

interestingly, too, after 30 minutes of exercise your body will naturally lose its efficiency to use carbohydrates as an energy source...hence the ingestion of a “sports drink” is vital when topping up energy stores..yes..take note on the 30 minute window...plan to refuel and sustain glucose levels.

for fitness..any run must be at least 40min..aerobic..fat-burning..and because energy is required.. light meal prior to run is good..and of course, hydration during and after are always a must..and after run..drink as much as you want..

it is advisable.. for run above 45-50min..it is considered above normal aerobic training..and so nutrition and hydration is required.. like a small meal or snack is needed..and endurance distance type runners...mostly will bring along their personal "hydration" assets..

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the good news is that at easy pace (appx. 1/2 minute per km slower than marathon race pace), most of us can go much longer without running out of glycogen, so there is no need to take gels when running that easy pace...if running at marathon race pace for a training run, you don’t need gels when running for 2 hours or less... 

 

A Runner's List of Fitness "Practices"...

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Until Injury Occurs...Health Concerns...

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What's Important...

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Better Understanding...Fitness...

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Better Understanding...Running Injury...

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Healthy Running...Injury-Free...

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Understanding Running...Force, Speed and Power...

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Reminding...How Running Boosts These Benefits...

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Because...Active Running...

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Adopting...Proper Exercise/Training Plan (Exercise *Physiology)...

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*Physiology, sometimes referred to as the "science of life", looks at living mechanisms, from the molecular basis of cell function to the whole integrated behavior of the entire body...

Run Well means...

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Running with Shoes...

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Barefoot Running...

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Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

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On 12/11/2016 at 6:24 PM, kohpapa said:

Exercise Zones in Age Group using Maximum Heart Rate

Calculation of Maximum Heart Rate
First, we need to know something about Heart Rate in different age groups. The easiest and best known method to calculate your maximum heart rate (HRmax) is to use the formula : HRmax = 220 - Age. The mean peak heart rate for women = 206 - (0.88 x age). I will say using this 220 - age to determine Max HR has a big limitation of not taking into account of individual's fitness level and resting heart rate to determine your training zone. Karvonen Forumula is slightly better here and you can read more about it at http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/heart-rate-reserve.html 

How do you get your heart rate on target?
Using a Heart Rate Monitoring device, track fitness/aerobic/anaerobic/peak performance with the "Heart Rate-Running Exercise Zones". 

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Heart Rate Training Zones : Heart rate training zones are calculated by taking into consideration your Maximum Heart Rate (MHR) and your Resting Heart Rate (RHR). 
The zones are:

• Energy Efficient or Recovery (60-70%)
Aerobic (70-80%)
• Anaerobic (80-90%)
• Red Line (90-100%)

Within each training zone, subtle physiological effects take place to enhance your fitness.

Allow me to share some thoughts on heart rate (HR) training and see some of my above replies in red for max HR.

Since we are talking about running, most runners are concerned about fat burning which is tapping into the aerobic zone.  Dr Phil Maffetone (Well known leading running authority and founder of MAF) has a 180 formula to determine your maximum aerobic heart rate to use for all aerobic training (be it running, rowing, indoor cycling, elliptical etc).

Quote

This “180 Formula” enables athletes to find the ideal maximum aerobic heart rate in which to base all aerobic training. When exceeded, this number indicates a rapid transition towards anaerobic work.

A good aerobic base isn’t important only for endurance athletes. The system that controls the body’s stress response is functionally linked to the anaerobic system. In other words, if you depend too much on your anaerobic system, you’ll be more stressed, and therefore more likely to overtrain or become injured. I discuss these topics more in depth in The MAF Test and in The New Aerobic Revolution.

Source: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ 

To find your maximum aerobic training heart rate, there are two important steps.

1) Subtract your age from 180.

2) Modify this number by selecting among the following categories a) to d) the one that best matches your fitness and health profile:

a)  If you have or are recovering from a major illness (heart disease, any operation or hospital stay, etc.) or are on any regular medication, subtract an additional 10.

b)  If you are injured, have regressed in training or competition, get more than two colds or bouts of flu per year, have allergies or asthma, or if you have been inconsistent or are just getting back into training, subtract an additional 5.

c)  If you have been training consistently (at least four times weekly) for up to two years without any of the problems just mentioned, keep the number (180–age) the same

d)  If you have been training for more than two years without any of the problems listed above, and have made progress in competition without injury, add 5.

Exemptions

e) The 180 Formula may need to be further individualized for people over the age of 65. For some of these athletes, up to 10 beats may have to be added for those in category (d) in the 180 Formula, and depending on individual levels of fitness and health. This does not mean 10 should automatically be added, but that an honest self-assessment is important.

f) For athletes 16 years of age and under, the formula is not applicable; rather, a heart rate of 165 may be best.

Once a maximum aerobic heart rate is found, a training range from this heart rate to 10 beats below could be used. For example, if you are 30 years old and fit into category (b), you get the following: 180–30=150. Then 150–5=145 beats per minute (bpm). In this example, 145 must be the highest heart rate for all training. The more training closer to the maximum of 145, the quicker an optimal aerobic base will be developed.Training above this heart rate rapidly incorporates anaerobic function, exemplified by a shift to burning more sugar and less fat for fuel.  
Initially, training at this relatively low rate may be difficult for some athletes. “I just can’t train that slowly!” is a common comment. But after a short time, you will feel better and your pace will quicken at that same heart rate. You will not be stuck training at that relatively slow pace for too long. Still, for many athletes it is difficult to change bad habits.

Source: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ (provided for people who want to learn more technical details about it as I provided a summary of the 180 Formula).

Edited by trailblazer

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kohpapa   

Something about Runners' knee...

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Well, the problem usually isn't the knee. Knee pain is usually the end result...

It has something to do with Runner's Gait...

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People with Runners knee often have weak Glutes (butts), Quadriceps (Quads) and Hamstrings muscles. Strengthening these muscles will reduce the weight going through the knee...


How Strong is Your Glutes (butts)?

One of the great maladies of today’s society is that the majority of people have weak glutes. We sit too long! And when we sit, our glutes get weaker (and looser)...

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Weak gluteus muscles and in particular, the gluteus medius muscle, leads to host of pain and even injuries. From the lower back all the way to knee area and even ankles, weak gluteus medius muscles leads to muscle imbalance and creates pain/injuries.

It’s pretty easy to tell who has weak glutes. All you have to do is to look at how they walk/run. Their gait is not smooth as it is with people who have normal or strong gluteus medius muscles . 

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How to find out Your Glutes are Weak?

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Correct Way: Lunge by keeping your knee in line with your ankle and not let it cave to the inside and IMMEDIATELY felt a difference. That correct movement is activated by your gluteus medius. 

Try ten “correct” lunges on each leg for about 6 reps. Work on getting your glutes (butts) stronger right away. Not just for running but for life in general. A strong glute (butt) is actually more important than we think.


Why strong glutes?

* Weak glutes can’t stabilize your pelvis, which causes it to tilt forward. This puts pressure on your lower spine.
* The lower back can be injured if it is forced to do the hip-extending job of the glutes.
* The ankles can be strained if misused due to improper alignment caused by inactive glutes.
* Strong glutes help you perform functional movements much better.
* Dead lifts, squats and lunges are only performed correctly and effectively if your glutes are activated. Otherwise, other muscles have to work harder, which makes you more prone to injury.


Stretching/Strengthening Exercises...

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Quadriceps (Quads) and Hamstrings...

The two main groups that support the knee. The quads are actually made up of four different muscles—Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastis Intermedius, and Vastis Medialis. The hamstrings consist of three different muscles—Biceps Femoris, Semitendinosus, and Semimembranosus. 
 

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Often knee pain is the result of such an imbalance. Sometimes a runner can have strong hamstrings that overpower his/her weaker quadriceps. When this happens it can cause the patella (knee cap) to be imbalanced resulting in pain. Because the quads are weaker, they're not able to support the knee which can cause the knee cap to twist and pull.

The opposite can also be true. A runner can have dominant quads which overpower the hamstrings. Your quads are typically stronger than your hamstrings, but they should only be about 25% stronger. Quads that are stronger than this can also cause an imbalance in the support of the knee cap.

To even further confuse you...you can have an imbalance within your quads. Remember there are 4 different quad muscles. If the inner quad (Vastis Medialis) is stronger, it can pull on the knee cap. If the outer quad (Vastis Lateralis) is stronger, it can pull on the knee cap. Just tight quads in general can also pull the knee towards one side.


Prevent Knee Pain...Rehabilatation Exercises...

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Progression...Quad Stretch...with no OUCH!!!

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Others...

Important Note 1: Our hamstrings, glutes, lower back, calves and Achilles’ tend to be both tight AND weak at the same time. It is known that strong glutes and hamstrings would make a stronger runner, and it is important to commit to strengthening these parts...

Important Note 2: Correction of muscle imbalances throughout your body will lead to one that is more functional than ever before. If you sit a long time during the day, chances are your body is so out of balance, that back pain, knee pain, ankle pain and others injuries abound in you.

How can Yoga Makes You a Better Runner?

"Yoga can even out your stride lengths, address strength imbalances between legs, and break the “compensation loop” of weaknesses becoming weaker and strengths becoming stronger."

uncle recommends upgrade to Warrior II... 21.gif

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then another one to Warrior III... 23.gif

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another great stretching Pose... 

 

how about doing Warrior combo.. balance with a Dancer Pose...drop gently to ground level.. with a Triangle Pose.. 

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"A good yoga practice will involve an equal number of elongation and contraction poses for most muscle groups. A pose that contracts the hamstrings and elongates the quads will often be followed by a pose that elongates the hamstrings and contracts the quads. Holding yoga poses during which the muscles are elongated also builds strength in that position. The end result is muscles that are strong during both the contraction and extension portion of any movement."

Standing Forward Bend Pose - great for core muscles...strong core is key for good running form... 

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Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

Edited by kohpapa
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kohpapa   

Myths and Fallacies that You Need to Stop Believing...Cardiovascular Fundamentals...Runs...

Myth 1: If you want to lose weight, just do lots of cardio...

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Fact 1: Your body is highly efficient machine. Simply put, if you do a lot of cardio, you will get really good at doing cardio. You will use less energy to get more done. This is great if you're training for an endurance event, but if your goal is weight loss you need to add strength training. Even when you’re not exercising, your muscles burn calories—the stronger they are the more calories they consume. A combination of strength training and cardio equals greater caloric expenditure and will get you to your weight loss goals faster.

To burn the maximum amount of fat, include both strength training and cardiovascular exercises in your workout routine.

Myth 2: There is an ideal running form that all runners should follow...

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Fact 2: There are certainly best practices that apply to everyone, but running form is individualized. Aside from arm swing, lean, and cadence, you probably run the way you do for a reason. Runners adjust technique over time, and is based on gradually increasing a slow cadence to a faster one (like 180). There is no one single ideal running form.

Myth 3: If I'm hungry while during training I'll lose more weight or I'll perform better when I race with nutrition. 

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act 3: "Fat burns in a carbohydrate fire." If you don't have accessible glycogen to start and keep you moving, you will not have an optimal workout. Sub optimal workouts do not produce optimal results.

Also, if you don't train your gastrointestinal system to include nutrition in endurance training, you're setting yourself up for failure in a race.

Myth 4: If running for weight-loss, skip the post-run recovery shake or meal—too many calories!

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Fact 4: Starving your body when it’s most in need is not something that is recommend. This is exactly the time to add calories. Consuming a 4:1 carb to protein ratio shake after runs in order to refill glycogen stores and speed up recovery is a good recommendation. In addition, you don't want to end up starving a few hours later and risk over-eating.

Myth 5: If your goal is weight loss, lower intensity long duration cardio is more effective than high intensity interval based cardio because at a lower intensity you can stay in the “fat burning zone.”

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Fact 5: Start by imagining you have 20 minutes to work out. Many people believe that they are "better off" doing low intensity cardio for that 20 minutes if their goal is weight loss because they will be exercising in the "fat burning zone.” This has been misconstrued to give people an excuse to not work as hard. The truth is that interval training is a MUCH better use of time.

Here’s why: though you will burn a greater PERCENTAGE of calories from fat during that hour, you will burn a much greater total amount of calories including more total calories from fat doing the interval training. Additionally, the recovery from interval training will be more demanding on energy stores and therefore you will continue to burn more calories after the workout. Bottom line-intervals are more effective use of time when your goal is weight loss.

Myth 6: Running at an easy pace is a waste of time and will not make me faster.

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Fact 6: Easy runs should be a staple in your week. They allow blood flow to muscles and provide recovery. They provide an essential base that enables high-intensity speed work. Easy runs are also easy to recover from and serve as a bridge to a come-back or a fresh start.

Myth 7: I need to run 42km in marathon training in order to finish the marathon on race day.

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Fact 7: Unless you are an ultra marathoner, running over 32km in training is risky. After 32km your body is depleted of calories and you face a long recovery period. In marathon training you don’t have time for long recovery periods. Find a plan you trust and you will be ok on race day. Marathon training is chess, not a slam-dunk contest.

Myth 8: Cardio takes place at the gym on a machine for a structured amount of time.

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Fact 8: Your body is happiest when you're integrating cardiovascular activity throughout the day. Take the stairs, walk to the market or commute to work on a bike a few days a week. Challenge yourself to sneak an elevated heart rate into your routine, get outside and mix it up.

Myth 9: “Running Sucks.”

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Fact 9: Nike jokes on one of their t-shirts that “Running Sucks.” While it can be challenging, painful, and heart-breaking at times, running provides us with a unique opportunity to test ourselves, push our limits, and experience progress. When we challenge ourselves with running, we do it to achieve glory rather than escape consequence.


What Are The Most Effective Ways to Improve Your Fitness So You Can Achieve Weight Loss Success?

The most effective ways to improve your fitness so you can see lasting weight loss include taking a total-body approach that includes both cardiovascular and resistance training activities. Cardiovascular exercises include activities such as walking, cycling, swimming, Rowing, Aerobics, etc...Any activity that raises your heart rate for a minimum of 20 minutes and burns calories while helping promote a healthy heart, lungs, and circulatory system is a good choice. As far as resistance training goes, calisthenics, circuit training, band training, boot camps, and muscle conditioning classes are all good options.

The goal with resistance training is to help build your overall muscle tone so that it increases your metabolism. This will enable you to burn more calories over the course of a day than just performing cardiovascular activities alone. One thing that is for sure, if weight loss is your goal, then you want to burn as many calories as you possibly can. That's when weight loss success happens!


So without further adieu, here are the Fallacies that are related to Cardiovascular Fundamentals...

* A major cause of heart disease is lack of adequate aerobic exercise.
* Aerobic exercise is the most effective form of cardiovascular training.
* Cardiovascular exercise is the most effective way of reducing bodyfat.
* Aerobic training is excellent for reducing overall stress in the body.
* Aerobic exercise is an excellent form of cross-training for all sport.
* Exercising above the aerobic threshold causes oxygen debt.
* One should never exercise above a training heart rate of about 80% of one’s maximum.
* Continuous long duration exercise offers the best form of cardiovascular conditioning.
* Cardiovascular training is the only form of exercise that produces endorphins.
* Cardiovascular training plays a major role in determining performance in most sports.
* Anaerobic training plays no significant role in improving cardiovascular performance.


Agreeable...

Cardiovascular exercises offer several benefits that can greatly improve your health and well-being...and Running is just one of these exercises...better with a structured Fitness Training Program...proper Injury and Recovery Management Plan ...collaborative Nutrition and Hydration Strategy...and for those who eventually Run as Sports...be prepared to change and adapt Program, Plan and Strategy...


Running is Addictive...The Runner’s High...

The “runner’s high” is a state of euphoria that can be experienced by someone engaged in a vigorous workout. It is known that when the body is pushed to its limits, it produces endorphins, in order to compensate for the pain. Endorphins, the natural opiates of the brain, are capable of inducing a euphoric feeling when they are present in the brain. Apart from endorphins, other neurotransmitters are believed to contribute to a runner’s high include epinephrine, serotonin, and dopamine.

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The high itself is variously described as a feeling of well-being, almost like floating or and out of body experience. It is typically related to longer periods of vigorous exercise rather than shorter, easier workouts, possibly due to the stress the body undergoes as the major muscle groups begin to run short on glucose. The exact time into exercise that kicks in varies between individuals.

The runner’s high is an extreme intense feeling, and like all such, can be habit forming. Exercise addiction is a rare but real condition thought to be caused by an addiction to the endorphins produced by the runner’s high. 

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It’s typically characterized by compulsion to exercise to the exclusion of all other activities...and that feeling is never always "Good"...in All Runs All the Times...and hence...the craving for..More Runs...Get High...to get back the feel "Good"...

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So...don't fall into the Fallible Logic: ‘Some Exercise Is Good, More Must Be Better’...Running is one of that Exercises...


So, Run in Moderation...Nutrition and Hydration Strategy...Injury and Recovery Management Plan

Any activity that raises your heart rate for a minimum of 20 minutes and burns calories while helping promote a healthy heart, lungs, and circulatory system is a good choice...AND resistance training with calisthenics, circuit training, band training, boot camps, and muscle conditioning classes ...AND DIY Stretching and Flexibility Exercises...will be sufficient for achieving weight loss success...

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uncle just share...a simple 7-minute Workout..

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are you ready.. 1-2-3.. JustDoLah!

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uncle just share some resistance training with the resistance band exercises below...complete 2-3 sets of 12-15 repetitions (or up to 25 repetitions)...should warm up first with 5-10 minutes of light aerobic exercise and cool down with another 5-10 minutes of gentle exercise..

Resistance Band Lunges 

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Resistance Band Squats

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Resistance Band Bent Over Rows

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Diagonal Woodchops

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Triceps Extension with Resistance Band

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Lateral Rows with Resistance Band

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Biceps Curls with Resistance Band 

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Run for Race...

So you want to run for Race...Training Needs Analysis...Training Program...Injury and Recovery Management Plan...Nutrition and Hydration Strategy...and that Instant Runner's High...
 

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Otherwise...just give me that darn Finisher Medal and T-shirt...without the Run...Thank You.

Video: Be Inpsired...Running High and Higher...

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

Edited by kohpapa

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kohpapa   

True Facts: Health Benefits Of Running...The Fundamentals...How is Run Fitness Measured?

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Video: Be Insipired...Why We Run...The Fundamentals...

How is Run Fitness Measured?

Standalone...

The Cooper 12 minute run is a popular maximal running test of aerobic fitness, was developed by Dr. Ken Cooper in 1968 as an easy way to measure aerobic fitness and provide and estimate of VO2 max for military personnel. This simple test is still used today as a field test for determining aerobic fitness.

When we talk about endurance, we generally refer to aerobic endurance. Aerobic exercise requires oxygen to help supply the energy needed for exercise. The objective of endurance training then, is to develop and improve the body systems that produce and deliver the energy needed to meet the demands of prolonged activity.

Purpose: to test aerobic fitness (the ability of the body to use oxygen to power it while running)
Equipment required: flat oval or running track, marking cones, recording sheets, stop watch.
Procedure: Place markers at set intervals around the track to aid in measuring the completed distance. Participants run for 12 minutes, and the total distance covered is recorded. Walking is allowed, though the participants must be encouraged to push themselves as hard as they can.

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VO2max : Fitness can be measured by the volume of oxygen you can consume while exercising at your maximum capacity. VO2max is the maximum amount of oxygen in millilitres, one can use in one minute per kilogram of body weight. Those who are fit have higher VO2max values and can exercise more intensely than those who are not as well conditioned. Numerous studies show that you can increase your VO2max by working out at an intensity that raises your heart rate to between 65 and 85% of its maximum for at least 20 minutes three to five times a week. A mean value of VO2max for male athletes is about 3.5 litres/minute and for female athletes it is about 2.7 litres/minute.

Use Online 12 Minute Test Results Calculator to compute VO2 Max 

12 Minute Run

VO2max is computed from (22.351 x kilometers) - 11.288

For example..cheetah, and is capable of running 11 km in 10 minutes, at an average speed of 65 km/h..its maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) reaches up to 300 ml of O2/kg/min, a value that is about 5 times higher than the average for similar sized mammals (32 kg body weight)..a typical thoroughbred horse can reach 180 ml/kg/min..Lance Armstrong has been measured at 85 ml/kg/min, and of course, confirmed tainted with steroid..so what's your personal..VO2max?

 

Run as Part of a Fitness Circuit...

hot ah.. super hot ah...IPPT Fitness Test..

can’t jump, can’t pull, can't run fast.. just do sit-ups, push-ups and 2.4km run. 

 Current IPPT Format vs Old Format...

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a simpler three-station format..

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the maximum points servicemen may earn for each station are 50 points for the 2.4km run station, and 25 points each for the Push Up and 25 points each for the Sit Up stations. ..and the maximum points ...can be achieved in the IPPT is 100. ..the points will be added together to form a final score, which will determine the serviceman's individual fitness standard.

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ok... uncle, old serviceman, once fit-combat commander, if wants to do the maximum 100 points..mmm

2.4km run:  RUN  10-min. (50 points)

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push-ups a minute:  23.gif  almost 50 (25 points)

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sit-ups a minute:  25.gif  almost 50 (25 points)

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The current IPPT Preparatory Training (IPT) programme appears more attractive with five different options to choose from: weight loss, aerobic, metabolic, IPPT-specific training and sports and games. And with the latter including football or basketball, NSmen could be forgiven for thinking that things may have been made a little easier.

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For someone who clocks two 7km runs a week, if you think five-station metabolic circuit training would not be a problem....think again...

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After thrusting medicine balls while executing star jumps, lifting kettlebells while doing half squats and doing wide-arm push-ups, crunches and burpees, feel the strain....until the whistle was finally blown...

Next up was the much-feared Tabata workout, which involves push-ups and 45 degree flutter kicks....go as hard as you could do for 20 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds - a process to be repeated 10 times...

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must kick away with gusto...head and hips must not be sagged....kicks must not be flapped, but must be fluttered...

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that's the 75-minute workout of fitness...the new IPPT programme which will stretch to everyone's physical limits.

There is no doubt other NSmen who want to toughen up will be better off for it. likedat...

so uncle-lin-papa commander can charge-ahhh... with chow hokkien bros shout loud loud... knn-chong-ahhh...like good old days....

aiya..we kpapakmaimee..sebei..song..."Training to be a soldier"

Video: Training to be a Soldier...

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Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

 

 

 

 

Edited by kohpapa

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HS Ong   

Excellent sharing kohpapa. Recently there is a new training trend that measures power instead of just heart rate.

There is an excellent book on this, Running with Power by Jim Vance and a new footpod by Stryd.

I have always use hrm to manage my training but starting next year I wil be measuring power as well.

 

Edited by HS Ong

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kohpapa   

Why Power Might Be the Ultimate Training Metric for Runners...

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There’s a new performance measurement tool for runners on the market..

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That is, if running power and training intensity matched, without lag. In other words, running power provides a consistent measure of training intensity for running. As we all know, one of the most important functions of any training device is to consistently monitor training intensity to help target particular training effects.

Video: What is Running Power?


It’s going to dramatically evolve the way we train, race, and perform down the road.

 

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Video: The Stryd Power Meter for Running

Heart rate monitors took the endurance sports world by storm in the early 1990s. The practice of heart rate monitoring appealed to cyclists, runners and triathletes as a way to make their training more precise and scientific.

By the late 1990s, a majority of cyclists and triathletes (if not the majority of runners, who always lag behind in terms of adopting new technologies) used heart rate monitors in every workout and race, heart rate-based training systems dominated systems based on other intensity metrics, and coaches such as Sally Edwards had made healthy careers as heart rate training gurus.

 

What is a Running Power Meter?

It’s a device that objectively measures the power output of a runner. More specifically, power is the measurement of how much work you are doing and how fast you are doing it, and is expressed in wattage (or watts). It measures or estimates force or speed (or both) using sensors inside the shoe or at the core of the body, similar to a heart-rate chest strap.

How is Running Power Measured?

This varies based on the device you’re using. Some devices, like Stryd, measure the motion pattern of your body’s center of mass and how much of an incline you’re running on using a chest sensor. After you input your weight, the device can figure out how much power your muscles are producing to make your center of mass move that way. The RPM2 device calculates power directly from an insole and measures step time, ground contact time, flight time, power, and foot strike.

What are the Benefits?

Here are three ways running with power can help improve your running performance:

1. Improved running form and efficiency
A running power meter can help you better see how your running technique and form correlate to your energy cost. Seeing your energy output as your form changes can help you smooth inefficiencies that can lead to fatigue later in a race. For example, improving your turnover cadence from 172 to 180-ish may help reduce your energy output (power), which helps you conserve energy and strength throughout your run or race. Runners who run with too much vertical oscillation (that is, bouncing up and down) can learn to translate more power into moving forward in the horizontal plane. This would show up as a savings of wattage and an increase in pace. Power meters allow you to see in real-time the energy output effects of changes to your form, and to compare those energy output effects to other metrics like pace and heart race.

2. More precise workouts
One of the coolest things about power meters is that they are an objective measurement of your effort. A power meter directly measures how much output is happening in the moment. Your heart rate is a physiological response to the stress on your body and can be affected by the temperature, how much you’ve slept, illness, stress, medications, and more. There is also a lag in the heart-rate response, so if you’re running uphill, it can take several seconds to catch up to the demands of the intensity. The same is true when running downhill. While power immediately drops as you begin to run downhill, your heart rate remains elevated until your body begins to recover from the stress of the climb. If you’re using heart rate to gauge effort, it will be lagging and can be inaccurate in real time.

Running by pace is similar. If I were to prescribe a workout at a specific tempo pace, and the runner ran it against a 20 mph headwind, that runner’s energy output and heart rate would be much higher than if she ran the same pace on a calm day. The same is true on a hilly course. By following a prescribed pace, the runner might train at higher stress loads than intended, which could affect performance and recovery.

By adding power to your other performance metrics, you can put your heart rate, pace, and how your body feels (perceived effort) in the context of your exact work output.

3. Pace like a champion
My Ironman friend who uses a power meter on his bike once described it as “cheating,” because once you know your threshold power, you can dial in your power zones and hold that number through your workout or race. Whether it’s windy, hilly, on a trail, or on a flat road, by learning how to pace by power, you can always be in the optimal zone on the given day and on any terrain.

It’s like a more accurate version of heart-rate training, as power is a direct measurement of your work output in the moment. You can set your device to stay within a lower power zone for your longer runs, in a moderate zone for tempo workouts, and higher for speed workouts. So, if you run that tempo run into a headwind, and follow your power zone instead of pace, you’ll run slower, but in the optimal zone on the given day. If there is a tailwind, you’ll be sailing along quite faster at the same amount of output. The same holds true for race day. By setting your power zones lower in the early stages of the race, you can conserve energy to push in the second half.

Thank you, HS Ong on sharing a device by Stryd... Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

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kohpapa   

A Runner's Must Know... Most Common Injury...

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Symptoms and Causes...

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Until Injury Occurs...Health Concerns...

Dear Uncle - Before SC Marathon Singapore Help 1:

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Dear Uncle - Before SC Marathon Singapore Help 2:

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PM uncle urgently and uncle replied...then..."You decide..." and the decision were...

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Injury Management Plan...

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KT TAPE IT Band Taping...  the goal so to keep the IT Band Taping the goal...

 

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

 

Edited by kohpapa

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HS Ong   

I cannot agree more on cross training and gym work for runners to incorp as part of injury prevention.

I was introduced to boxing last year November and I have diligently attend 2 classes of 1 hour each week for 1 year and I can see the improvement in my core and overall body strenght.

Boxing training can be less boring too but of course not every runner have an interest to pick this sport up but I hapen to like boxing.

Another routine I incorp is a regular sports massage, especially after a race. I find this is very effect to untangle tight muscles after all the training mileage.

Edited by HS Ong

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kohpapa   
27 minutes ago, HS Ong said:

I was introduced to boxing last year November and I have diligently attend 2 classes of 1 hour each week for 1 year and I can see the improvement in my core and overall body strenght.

Boxing training can be less boring too but of course not every runner have an interest to pick this sport up but I hapen to like boxing.

Another routine I incorp is a regular sports massage, especially after a race. I find this is very effect to untangle tight muscles after all the training mileage.

Dear HS Ong,

Thank you for your sharing...abuthen...we focus on Running here (this is a Run Forum). Perhaps if uncle introduces aerobic and anaerobic running routine as cross-training combo...yes, I also advocate cross-training like in triathlon - swim and bike (both can be aerobic and anaerobic nature)..as well as Yoga (for guys and ladies who want to stretch)...uncle got more Yoga exercises and routines for Runners...later..

Thank you for following this thread, and be mindful of injury of runners is why this thread is meant for - Identify and Manage Injury Prevention Plan, ultimately Run with No pain and Injury Free is the focus and theme....

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19 hours ago, trailblazer said:

Allow me to share some thoughts on heart rate (HR) training and see some of my above replies in red for max HR.

Since we are talking about running, most runners are concerned about fat burning which is tapping into the aerobic zone.  Dr Phil Maffetone (Well known leading running authority and founder of MAF) has a 180 formula to determine your maximum aerobic heart rate to use for all aerobic training (be it running, rowing, indoor cycling, elliptical etc).

To find your maximum aerobic training heart rate, there are two important steps.

1) Subtract your age from 180.

2) Modify this number by selecting among the following categories a) to d) the one that best matches your fitness and health profile:

a)  If you have or are recovering from a major illness (heart disease, any operation or hospital stay, etc.) or are on any regular medication, subtract an additional 10.

b)  If you are injured, have regressed in training or competition, get more than two colds or bouts of flu per year, have allergies or asthma, or if you have been inconsistent or are just getting back into training, subtract an additional 5.

c)  If you have been training consistently (at least four times weekly) for up to two years without any of the problems just mentioned, keep the number (180–age) the same

d)  If you have been training for more than two years without any of the problems listed above, and have made progress in competition without injury, add 5.

Exemptions

e) The 180 Formula may need to be further individualized for people over the age of 65. For some of these athletes, up to 10 beats may have to be added for those in category (d) in the 180 Formula, and depending on individual levels of fitness and health. This does not mean 10 should automatically be added, but that an honest self-assessment is important.

f) For athletes 16 years of age and under, the formula is not applicable; rather, a heart rate of 165 may be best.

Once a maximum aerobic heart rate is found, a training range from this heart rate to 10 beats below could be used. For example, if you are 30 years old and fit into category (b), you get the following: 180–30=150. Then 150–5=145 beats per minute (bpm). In this example, 145 must be the highest heart rate for all training. The more training closer to the maximum of 145, the quicker an optimal aerobic base will be developed.Training above this heart rate rapidly incorporates anaerobic function, exemplified by a shift to burning more sugar and less fat for fuel.  
Initially, training at this relatively low rate may be difficult for some athletes. “I just can’t train that slowly!” is a common comment. But after a short time, you will feel better and your pace will quicken at that same heart rate. You will not be stuck training at that relatively slow pace for too long. Still, for many athletes it is difficult to change bad habits.

Source: https://philmaffetone.com/180-formula/ (provided for people who want to learn more technical details about it as I provided a summary of the 180 Formula).

I read about this a while ago.... it's a good way to know about your rough range for heart rate without even measuring it... these days I have deviated my focus from HR to actual pace already.. cause maybe I am using the chest strap and it starts to get a little uncomfortable.. and also I felt that keeping the same pace and see your HR lowers is easier than keeping the same HR and see the pace gets faster....

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kohpapa   

Plantar fasciitis...that sharp, tight, painful sensation at the base of the heel...

Any time you see “itis” at the end of a word, it means there’s inflammation involved .Plantar fasciitis, an inflammation in the bottom of the foot, is perhaps the peskiest problem that plagues the running wounded. 

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The feeling has been described as comparable to stepping heel first onto a nail. Eventually, the pain might go away as the day or a run is carried out, only to return afterward or again the next day.

Plantar Fasciitis is a common running injury and is also common among people who spend a lot of time on their feet in shoes. 

How long to does it take Plantar Fasciitis to heal?

Sure, getting arch supports or wearing a night splint may provide some immediate relief, but they often don’t end up being a long term solution. Despite what many believe, it can be cured long term, it just takes a bit of commitment.

Psst...PF isn’t common in among habitual barefoot populations...in fact, it doesn’t exist among people that don’t wear shoes...

Plantar Fasciitis Treatment

1. Reduce Inflammation
* Ice (Rolling a frozen Dixie cup works well)
* Topical Anti-Inflammatory, preferably Myomed
* Anti-Inflammatory
* Soft Arch Supports (When not strengthening)

2. Break Up Scar Tissue/Stretch
* Deep tissue massage every 3rd day
* Roll a Foot Rubz ball (preferable) or Golf/Tennis Ball regularly
* Stretch Calves & Feet 

3. Strengthen your feet (Most Important Part)

In conjunction with reducing the inflammation and reducing the scar tissue that is built up as a result, making the feet strong seems to be the long term solution to curing Plantar Fasciitis. 

* Start with 30 seconds of barefoot running/walking on soft/natural surfaces and add 30 seconds every day or 2 (Probably the single most effective way to eradicate PF; subtract this time from your regular workout, i.e. 30 Minute Regular Workout = 29 minutes in shoes, 1 minute barefoot)
* Pull in a towel w/toes and repeat
* Pick up marbles w/toes and spell alphabet
* Stand on one foot (affected foot)
1) Waiting in line, standing at work, whenever, wherever
2) As an exercise: barefoot eyes closed on carpet

In theory, wearing shoes and arch supports do for our feet what our feet should be doing for themselves, which ultimately ends up weakening our feet. As our feet become weaker, we need more and more support, and a cycle of dependence is in place. 

It stands to reason that if habitually barefoot people don’t experience Plantar Fasciitis while those of us with shoes and arch supports do, there has to be a reason. That reason is likely that their feet are strong while ours are weak.

This is the reason people may feel some relief when getting arch supports or orthotics, but a few months to a few years later, the pain comes back worse than ever. 

Even those that say they like orthotics admit that they are dependent on them and wish they didn’t “have to” wear them. In essence, they don’t. Even dependence on arch support can be reduced by returning the feet to their natural state by making them strong. To say that we “need” support is to argue that we weren’t created right or that evolution didn’t work.

Returning our feet to a more natural state by reducing the inflammation that has built up, breaking up the scar tissue, and then strengthening the feet will have very positive effects with arch and heel pain and throughout the body.

The goal is to inversely fade out the need for support while slowly fading in foot strengthening, thus making the foot strong and independent...

Important Note 1: Stay away from being barefoot on hard, flat, surfaces, etc. until feet are strong enough to handle it.

Important Note 2: Feet have been weakened by years of shoes and arch support, it will take some time to get feet strong enough to reverse those effects.

Important Note 3: Continue strengthening/barefoot running once or twice a week

 

Plantar Fasciitis Experience Shared

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so..one need to know flexibility exercise/traning for barefoot running...stretching/strengthening ..as post recovery/pre-barefoot run...

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use toes of foot to pick up objects.. like pebbles..small balls..ping pong ball..squash ball..tennis ball.. or "write" in alphabets or even numbers...

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uncle recommends this one..for advanced barefoot running flexibility and strengthening training...for fun... 

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Plantar Fasciitis leads to Heel Spurs Experience Shared 

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Dear Uncle, 

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PF and Heel Spurs Combo Experience Shared with regards to Barefoot Running...

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Injury Management Plan... The goal is to keep  Fixing Plantar Fasciitis and Heel Pain  the goal

 

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

 

Edited by kohpapa

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26 minutes ago, AutumnRunner said:

I read about this a while ago.... it's a good way to know about your rough range for heart rate without even measuring it... these days I have deviated my focus from HR to actual pace already.. cause maybe I am using the chest strap and it starts to get a little uncomfortable.. and also I felt that keeping the same pace and see your HR lowers is easier than keeping the same HR and see the pace gets faster....

I am also using the chest strap and have worn it for races before, so not an issue so long proper adjustments are made before wearing.  The last thing we want to do is to overstress our heart and end up doing a much higher intensity workout (unless the focus is on intervals --> higher intensity, then yes, I disregard aerobic zone HR).  

The HR should get lower/improve once we are used to the running pace, then it is time to increase the pace to match the max aerobic heart rate. (our goal). Quote an illustrative example. If one runner does a 6min/km pace and the heart rate is hovering at 130+  (assuming max aerobic HR is 150), it is not at the optimal level and can afford to increase it to say 5:45min/km pace. With smart and careful training, the average pace should increase and 6min/km should be very manageable by then, showing marked improvements.

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kohpapa   

Thank you coach tbz on Heart Rate Monitoring device, track fitness/aerobic/anaerobic/peak performance with the "Heart Rate-Running Exercise Zones"...

Moving on to another common run injury...What Could We Do About Achilles Tendinitis?

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Achilles tendonitis is an inflammation of the Achilles tendon. This inflammation is typically short-lived. Over time, if not resolved, the condition may progress to a degeneration of the tendon (Achilles tendonosis), in which the tendon loses its organized structure and is likely to develop microscopic tears. Sometimes the degeneration involves the site where the Achilles tendon attaches to the heel bone. In rare cases, chronic degeneration with or without pain may result in rupture of the tendon.

Causes

Achilles tendinitis can be caused by any activity that puts stress on your Achilles tendon. Tendinitis can develop if you run or jump more than usual or exercise on a hard surface. Tendinitis can be caused by shoes that do not fit or support your foot and ankle. Tight tendons and muscles, You may have tight hamstring and calf muscles in your upper and lower leg. Your tendons also become stiffer and easier to injure as you get older. Arthritis, Bony growths caused by arthritis can irritate the Achilles tendon, especially around your heel.

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Tight or fatigued calf muscles, which transfer too much of the burden of running to the Achilles, can be brought on by not stretching the calves properly, increasing mileage too quickly or simply overtraining. Excessive hill running or speedwork, both of which stress the Achilles more than other types of running, can also cause tendinitis. Inflexible running shoes, which force the Achilles to twist, cause some cases. Runners who overpronate (their feet rotate too far inward on impact) are most susceptible to Achilles tendinitis.

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Symptoms

Symptoms include pain in the heel and along the tendon when walking or running. The area may feel painful and stiff in the morning. The tendon may be painful to touch or move. The area may be swollen and warm. You may have trouble standing up on one toe.

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Diagnosis

A doctor examines the patient, checking for pain and swelling along the posterior of the leg. The doctor interviews the patient regarding the onset, history, and description of pain and weakness. The muscles, tissues, bones, and blood vessels may be evaluated with imaging studies, such as X-ray, ultrasound, or MRI.

Nonsurgical Treatment

Many physical therapies exist to help with the pain. We have found the combination of modalities, stretching, acupuncture, footwear modification and myofascial release to be very effective. 
 

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Surgical Treatment

If several months of more-conservative treatments don't work or if the tendon has torn, your doctor may suggest surgery to repair your Achilles tendon.

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Prevention

You can take measures to reduce your risk of developing Achilles Tendinitis. This includes, Increasing your activity level gradually, choosing your shoes carefully, daily stretching and doing exercises to strengthen your calf muscles. As well, applying a small amount Heelspur Cream onto your Achilles tendon before and after exercise.

If you start having Achilles tendon pain it is best to immediately modify your activities to reduce pain. Since this is an overuse injury, the best immediate treatment is to rest your foot and ankle. 

Anti-inflammatory medication can be helpful for both swelling and pain. If the pain continues for over a week, it is advised to seek medical attention from an orthopedic specialist...



Achilles Tendinitis and Plantar Fasciitis...

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Interesting Note 1:

Pain on the back of the heel is usually Achilles tendinitis, not plantar fasciitis. While symptoms may be very similar, they are two very different conditions. The Achilles tendon is the large tendon that attaches to your heel bone right where the back of your shoe hits your ankle. This motion provides the power in the push off phase of the gait cycle. Pain in this area is related to inflammation and overuse of the Achilles tendon.

Plantar fasciitis is typically on the bottom of the heel. Pain and inflammation of plantar fasciitis is also related to overuse.

Interesting Note 2:

Achilles tendonitis starts after a particular activity places too much stress on the tendon. This condition usually hurts when you first get out of bed in the morning and can also be worse after heavy activity. Swelling and worsening pain occurs if the condition goes untreated. Most people tend to delay seeking treatment assuming that it will get better on its own.

Healing of the Achilles tendon is often slow...

Achilles tendonitis is a term that is somewhat misleading, because with Achilles tendon pain, there is frequently no inflammation of the Achilles tendon. Most attempts to fix Achilles tendon pain involve treatment directly to the Achilles tendon. But treating the Achilles tendon usually does not fix the problem, because there is often nothing wrong with the Achilles tendon. 

The Achilles pain is just a symptom. In fact, medical researches don't even call it tendonitis anymore -- it's called a tendinopathy -- which means it hurts, but we really don't know what's wrong.

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Injury Management Plan... The goal is to keep  Fixing Achilles Tendinitis  the goal

 

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

Edited by kohpapa

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kcslchin   

just discovered this thread.

Uncle Kohpapa. You macam encyclopaedia+GoogleSearch+Wikipedia combine.

 

Super interesting articles. Most of the exercises I know but lack discipline to do regularly :lol:

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kohpapa   

Thank you bro kcslchin, just to make up for lost posts because i was banned 2.5 years back...Super interesting articles were collections of what from another runner forum..original..encyclopaedia+GoogleSearch+Wikipedia combine...whatever...continue...

What with my running shoes...My Left Leg... Dear Uncle:{

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Uncle explained:

When you run....

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Running Gait determines...types of Running Shoes recommeded for fitting...professionally...

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Therefore, landing on the outside of the heel is perfectly common...for most Runners...

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However...excessive running for too long...and repetitive...on your old pair of trainers on the lateral heel...PAIN!

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Why...the wear on the left heel is outward, heavily?

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Naturally...We tend to Run Conventionally on the Track...Counter-clockwisely...

Recommend Lateral Heel Wedge to be fitted professionally on the Left Shoe...Time to Change to a New pair of Trainers...
 

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Dear Uncle:) The last picture really help me find a perfect fit my shoes. After measuring, I think my ankles little bit roll out. So maybe I should choose very carefully.

 

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Happy Running with No Pain!!!

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

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kohpapa   

Shin Splints - One of the 5 Most Troublesome Running Injuries...

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The other four: Runner’s Knee, IT Band Syndrome, Plantar Fasciitis, Achilles Tendinitis

The symptoms: The umbrella term “shin splints” can refer to a number of ailments that involve pain in the shin area. At their worst, shin splints can turn into a stress fracture along the tibia, and searing pain will be felt with every stride; in less severe cases, the muscles in the shin area may be tender and inflamed, and pain lessens a few miles into the run. Either way, shin pain is a surefire way to make your running experience markedly unenjoyable.

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This painful leg injury can lead to a stress fracture if not properly taken care of...

The causes: Shin pain can most often be traced back to a sudden spike in training volume and intensity. This is why, for example, it is a common complaint among brand-new runners beginning a training program and young athletes at the start of high school track or cross-country season. When you run, your lower legs take all of the initial impact forces, which then run through the rest of your body. Newer runners’ lower legs aren’t yet strong enough to handle this stress, which is why it’s important to develop a solid base before increasing mileage or introducing speed work. Combine that inexperience with regular running on hard surfaces and worn-out or improper footwear and you have a recipe for disaster. And as with many of the aforementioned injuries, tight muscles don’t help matters either. The less mobile the muscles surrounding your shin are, the more stress there is on the entire area.

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The fix: Rest, ice, and anti-inflammatories will help reduce the tenderness and inflammation. As you ease back into running, pay attention to your training, as well as to your equipment and environment. Increasing volume and intensity too quickly will almost always lead to trouble. The training plans in this book are designed to up your volume and intensity methodically and slowly, which eases you into the stress that running a lot asks of your legs. Running on soft surfaces such as trails or grass will help reduce the impact on your lower legs, and paying close attention to the mileage on your running shoes will ensure that you’re not trotting on tired treads.

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It’s been demonstrated that female runners with a small calf circumference have a much higher risk of developing a tibial stress fracture,so it is no surprise that runners with shin splints have poor calf strength.

Improving Calf Strength Can Fix Your Shin Splints...

This helps reducing the strain on your tibia, but more importantly, will lead to a stronger tibia in response to the increased muscular strength and size. 

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How to treat Shin Splints (Medial tibial stress Syndrome / Periostitis) with Kinesiology tape...

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Injury Management Plan... The goal is to keep Treating Shin Splints the goal

 

 

 

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

Edited by kohpapa

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kohpapa   

5 Running Mistakes You Didn't Know You Make...

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If you're a runner, it can be hard to see your own mistakes.

Unless you're constantly running alongside a full-length mirror to check out your reflection, it's impossible to notice that your posture is off. Maybe you have back pain, but you're not sure where it's coming from. Or maybe you're not getting the most out of your stride, but you're not sure how to properly adjust it.

1. Asymmetrical running pattern

An asymmetrical running pattern — landing harder on one side of the body than the other - this can be observed by listening to the way you run.

If a runner comes down harder on the right side than the left, or vice versa, it could signal an inherent mechanical flaw of the running style that can lead to pain .

2. Inward knee collapse and weak hips

Another running problem observed are people whose knees collapse inward when they run, which is caused by weak gluteus muscles.

When you run, your knees are supposed to stay in line with your hips. But if your hip muscles are weak and aren't supporting your body weight, that weight will go to your knees and cause them to bow inward. The knee bends and takes the shock.

To resolve this problem, do exercises to build up the posterior gluteus medius and the gluteus maximus, two of the key muscles in the buttocks.

3. Running on your fore-foot when you're really a rear-foot runner (and vice versa)

Some people are rear-foot runners who strike down harder on the rear part of the feet, and others are forefoot runners and strike down harder on the front part of their feet. One running style is not necessarily better than the other, but impact forces may be different between the two running styles.

Rear-foot runners tend to have a higher amount of force exerted on their feet when they strike down compared with forefoot runners. 

You do not necessarily have to change from a rear-foot strike pattern to a forefoot pattern, but a physical therapist can help to make subtle changes in mechanics to reduce pain.

Running Tips from a Physical Therapist...

Kristin Huppi, PT, DPT, CSCS, demonstrates stretches and warm up for runners, and explains how a physical therapist helps runners improve their technique to prevent injury...

 

Forefoot running has gained popularity with the marketing of “barefoot” running shoes, but it takes time and training to run in this manner if you're a natural rear-foot runner.

The problem with forefoot running with some people is [that] their feet aren’t strong enough to support their weight...

That's why if you're going to transition to forefoot or barefoot running, and you’ve been a rear-foot shoe runner, then you need to make that progression gradually so you can increase the strength of your foot.

What is forefoot running?

Newton Running founder Danny Abshire demonstrates the finer points of forefoot running: proper athletic position; finding your sweet spot; the difference between walking stride, jogging stride, efficiency running and spiriting; and using the "Land, Lever, Lift" technique to perfect your form.

 

 

4. Over-striding and over-swinging

Over-striding and swinging your arms unevenly are two of the main causes of back pain from running.

We tend to move in certain ways, or favor certain movements, that in the long term can contribute to stress on the back.

Some people believe you alter your movements because of back pain, but our philosophy is that improper movement or postural alignment may increase the stress on the lower back and cause back pain.

Over-striding, which occurs when the steps you take are too big for your body size, can spur excessive rotation because the pelvis and spine move toward one direction more than the other.

Swinging one arm further back than the other can also contribute to the spine misalignment while running.

5. Being unaware of your foot type

Not everyone is blessed with perfect arches — and those who are more flat-footed than they realize could be suffering for it.

People might recognize the fact that they don’t have great arches, but they might be wearing shoes that aren’t appropriate for their foot type.

But wearing the wrong shoes can lead to hip, back and knee pain.

It's best to go to a custom orthotics or specialty running-shoe store to buy special shoes for flat feet.

Sneakers from the regular big-box stores don't have custom fits, so they may not be able to alleviate pain.

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

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kohpapa   

Why Tabata Training is the New Norm in Health and Fitness...

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Get fit fast? Great, sign us up. Get fit in four minutes? Now we're skeptical. But while getting results in a fraction of the time might sound like the stuff of fitness legend, one reseacher is out to prove his hyper-efficient Tabata protocol — which takes just four minutes of exercise per session — is anything but a marketing scheme. And now he's set on bringing it to the masses.

What It Is...

If you're a fan of interval training, chances are you've heard about Tabata training, the interval program that calls for 20 seconds of all-out intensity followed by 10 seconds of rest, repeated eight times. The four-minute timing was developed by Dr. Izumi Tabata in the mid-1990s, when he first tested his namesake protocol on elite Japanese speed skaters.

But the doctor didn't stop with just the elite, and subsequent research showed the protocol beat out more time-intensive, steady state training because it boosted the body's aerobic and anaerobic pathways (meaning it made exercisers more efficient at both short, intense exercise and longer, slower sessions).

Tabata's findings have also held up when tested by other researchers, making it one of the most widely researched interval programs to date.

Now, Dr. Tabata wants to bring his protocol to the masses. While Tabata's research has led to the protocol's adoption by many in the fitness industry — including CrossFit and other popular exercise methodologies — he's concerned many aren't using the system that effectively. Namely, the 20-second intervals need to be all-out sprints.

Latest: The doctor is concerned people aren't hitting the necessary intensity during those sprints: "If you feel OK afterwards you've not done it properly." His forthcoming instructional videos (The Guardian reported on a deal with Universal Studios to develop a DVD series highlighting the system) could help encourage exercisers to push past their perceived limits and hit the level of intensity necessary to get Tabata's full effect.

Is It "Legit" Fitness?

Fans of interval training: "Tabata protocol is one of the most tested, proven programs out there. It's also great at boosting the post-exercise oxygen consumption, the so-called "afterburn effect" that burns fat even after we leave the gym. Tabata protocol is also flexible when it comes to exercise selection, and after a proper warm-up, it can be done running, biking, and with weighted and bodyweight resistance movements (we're big fans of burpees)."

The key, as the good doctor says, is intensity. It's difficult for beginners to reach the point of complete, utter exhaustion without a little professional encouragement. And Tabata beginners, take note: You might only last five or six intervals the first time. That's how hard it's supposed to be.


Those With Very Little Time...

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Those Who Want Flexible Routines and Have 30mins...

Currently, i am doing a weekly session of 5 mins Z5 run, 90 secs recovery run, repeat 4 times. Is this Enough? 

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incorporate with the existing classic method..Tempo Run..

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aerobic interval training..2 minutes of faster-pace activity then 30 seconds slow pace activity...perform 10 faster-pace interval..gives 20-min of fast pace tempo workout

with Tabata Method for Runner:

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medium sub-maximal interval training..70% VO2 Max..20 seconds of fast-pace activity then 10 seconds of slow pace activity, perform 8 faster-pace intervals..faster-pace in this case means a speed which you could only sustain for not a whole lot longer than 45 seconds or so...Tabata Method is 4 mins Z5 run, 80 secs recovery run workout plan

high near-maximal interval training..75-85% VO2 Max..20 seconds of fast-pace activity then 10 seconds of slow pace activity..faster-pace in this case means a pace which you could only sustain for about 1 to 2 minutes..do this for a total of 10-12 minutes training time - basically keep alternating those work and rest intervals until you've done up to 12 minutes.. Tabata Method 4 mins Z5 run, 80 secs recovery run, repeat 3 times workout plan

Dr. Tabata is concerned many aren't using the system that effectively. Namely, the 20-second intervals need to be all-out sprints.

If we should use a 20-min workout...Tabata Method 4 mins Z5 run , 80 secs recovery run, repeat 5 timesworkout plan vs. our runner's 5 mins Z5 run, 90 secs recovery run, repeat 4 times... see the almost similarity in HIIT workout plan..so understand how easy to implement...Tempo Run High-Intensive Interval Training...vs...Tempo Run Classic Method...In HIIT, your rest breaks are shorter than your training pieces...expect yourself to collapse in puddles of sweat by the end...

Is this enough?.. Tabata Method for Runner's Recommended Frequency: 2-4x per week.. can use HIIT workout plan...


Those Who Have 45min and More and Want to Incorporate Strength Training into HIIT...

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Let Uncle explains further...

Marathon running vs Sprinting...

How you train, determines how you look...

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So Let's analyze here, why exactly these athletes look so different...

they train differently....

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A marathon runner trains by running long distances over longer periods of time at a lower intensity and speed..uses the Oxidative Pathway of Energy...

A Sprinter , however, trains by running shorter distances for a few seconds by giving it all he's got...uses the Anaerobic Pathway of Energy...

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Both seem OK on the face of it...

Which animal on the face of this earth jogs at low intensity for 6 hours (or how many ever hours marathon runner train), and why would it do anything like this?

Leaving athletes who compete in the spirit of the sport aside, but why would you and I walk/slowly jog for 1-2 hours on the treadmill to look like them? I'm sure you don't want to look like a marathon runner! Then why would you train like one?

Our Body is simple. It adapts to an external stimuli and makes itself capable of handling it.


So, why would you look like a marathon runner by doing hours of low intensity cardio...

To sustain and get energy for a longer period, the body's only source is "FAT". Glycogen in the muscle is used for short bursts of energy requirement and Fats are required by the body to provide energy for low intensity long duration exercises like walking/jogging/easy running for 1-2 hours...


What does your body do?

It slowly, throws away the Muscles (which fulfills energy requirement for short bursts of intense exercise) and stores more fat, because it needs to adapt itself to be able to sustain 1-2 hours of cardio)...

Outcome: You lose a little bit of Fat and a lot of muscle. You may Lose "Weight" at the cost of your muscles and you'll end up looking like a Marathon runner eventually...

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What happens when you train like a sprinter?

Since energy for short bursts of heavy duty requirement like, Sprinting, Short Put, Boxing, Cricket, Baseball Pitching, Soccer, comes from Glycogen stored in the muscles, your body tries to gain Muscles and tries to throw away the excess FAT, since it doesn't need it anymore, because you aren't doing anymore of low intensity cardio for 1-2 hours. 

Look at the difference between the legs of a Marathon runner and a sprinter. Notice that a marathon runner has more Fat than muscle and the sprinter has more muscle than Fat.

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Besides, a Sprinter Workout takes only about 20 mins vs a Marathon runner's workout that people do for anywhere between 1-2 hours. Also, a sprinter's workout increases your BMR and helps in burning calories even after you finish your cardio.

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Training in Your Energy Pathway...

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The choice is yours to Make...Make a Choice and Train like One...

Your body adapts to sustain your training...

Uncle gives example...let's say  Train like a Sprinter for Fat Loss...Principle of Adaptation...HIIT

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The body adapts or reacts to Loads or Activity that it is subjected to, by making itself more capable of handling the same activity the next time...

This adaption takes place during sleep or rest or when we provide our bodies proper nutrition and take care of it...

Interesting Note: Muscles do not actually grow in the gym...they grow when they heal and become stronger when you rest & recover from the work out by giving your body the right nutrition.

So, to look like a sprinter, you must train like one A sprinter...runs hard and gives it his/her all for 20 sec/30 sec/60 sec/2 mins/3 mins. So to make the body stronger and capable of doing this, you must train in a similar manner.


High Interval Intensive Training...HIIT That Sprint...

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Why HIIT?

1. You burn more calories. Higher the intensiy of the exercise, more calories will be burnt.
2. You burn calories even after you finish working out . Regular low intensity training only burns calories while you are for eg. walking. Once you stop, the calorie burning stops, where as HIIT also results in burning calories after you workout.
3. Your Metabolism will shoot through the roof, which will result in better results of Fat loss and calorie Burning off the field
4. You Heart becomes stronger. HIIT challenges your heart much more than regular cardio and actually makes your heart stronger. As your heart adapts, it will result in a lower Resting Heart rate, which means it will work more efficiently i.e. it will PUMP MORE VOLUME OF BLOOD in One Beat !!
5. YOU SAVE TIME!!! Regular cardio takes 45-60 minutes. I know people who walk for 1.5 -2 hours !! But HIIT Takes only 20 Minutes!! 
6. You don't need any additional equipment.
7. You wont get Bored!


Warning...Before You HIIT That Sprint...

Interval training is not appropriate for all. 

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If you have a chronic health condition, heart condition, or other exercise specific injuries or if you haven't been exercising regularly, consult your doctor before trying any type of interval training.

HIIT is recommended with a 2-day full recovery...for Muscles to grow efficiently with right nutrition...


Run/Sprint...

As hard as you can...Run for your life...Here's a sentence test : "I ran so fast that I cant speak this sentence in one breath"...if you can speak this sentence in one breath, may be you didn't sprint hard enough....


Progression Training Plan...HITT That Sprint...Begins...

Sample HIIT 18 minute Training schedule: W.I.= Work Interval, R.I.=Rest Interval

Warm-Up Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog: 5mins

Work Interval (W.I.) 30secs R.I. 4mins
Work:Rest Ratio is 1:8

W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 4mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 4mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 4mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 4mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)

Cool Down Walk 2-5mins


Improve the Fitness...Adaptation Phase I...

Sample HIIT 10 minute Training schedule: W.I.= Work Interval, R.I.=Rest Interval

Warm-Up Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog: 5mins

Work:Rest ratio of 1:4

W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 2mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 2mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 2mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 2mins (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)

Cool Down Walk 2-5mins


Improve the Fitness...Adaptation Phase II...

Sample HIIT 8 minute Training schedule: W.I.= Work Interval, R.I.=Rest Interval

Warm-Up Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog: 5mins

Work:Rest ratio of 1:2

W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 1min (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 1min (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 1min (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 30secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 1min (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)

Cool Down Walk 2-5mins


Improve the Fitness...Adaptation Phase III...

Fitness with Tabata 4-minute HIIT That Sprint Workout: W.I.= Work Interval, R.I.=Rest Interval

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Warm-Up Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog: 5mins

Work:Rest ratio of 2:1

W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)
W.I. = 20secs (Run/Sprint) R.I. = 10secs (Walk/Brisk Walk/Jog)

Cool Down Walk 2-5mins


Congratulations...You have become a Tabata HIIT Fit Runner...

To progress further...Repeat 2x, or 3x...not more than 20-30min...

 

Be Inspired...Tabata Running...

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Intensity in Your Runs...Run Workout

Enjoy...Running for the health and fitness: No Pain Injury Free..

Edited by kohpapa

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