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kkcy

weekly mileage

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I've been reading quite a bit on RW forums, and it seems that every single one of them do about at least 30 mpw, which is about 48kmpw. And even then, that is considered super little to them.

My question is, how many of us here actually run so much? And for people who can hit times of sub 45 10k, what is your weekly mileage like? And is it really necessary to run so much in order to improve? Time isn't really on my side and its a bit hard to run that much.

Then again, is it because we think that 30 mpw is too much, hence people here are generally slower than people in like US?

Thanks!

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I'm not naturally fit like some runners, so I need to work hard to stay in shape. I do about 50-55km per week, excluding speed work. My 10k best is 38min 2sec and my marathon best is 3hr 25min. Some of my friends train a bit more, but have much faster times. Oh well...

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Mileage shouldnt be the factor to judge a person's performance, and we also shouldnt get too obsessed with that. However, a higher mileage will definitely improve your running as you develop stronger muscles, and also improve your cardio etc. But another factor to improve your performance is the kind of runs you do, eg. long runs, intervals, tempo etc. For eg, if you're going to train for a marathon, you may be running 30mpw, but most of your runs are short runs, like maybe you run 7km every day. but it doesnt mean you will be running the same timing as another person who maybe running 30mpw too but focus more on long runs. Dont increase your mileage too quickly within a short period as it may just cause injury. Diff bodys suit diff training mileage, so go and find the one that suits yours.

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I've been reading quite a bit on RW forums, and it seems that every single one of them do about at least 30 mpw, which is about 48kmpw. And even then, that is considered super little to them.

My question is, how many of us here actually run so much? And for people who can hit times of sub 45 10k, what is your weekly mileage like? And is it really necessary to run so much in order to improve? Time isn't really on my side and its a bit hard to run that much.

Then again, is it because we think that 30 mpw is too much, hence people here are generally slower than people in like US?

Thanks!

I have a few thoughts on this:

1. Timing is as much a matter of quality of training as it is quantity. Simply put, if you want to run fast in an event, you need to train fast - not all the time but at least some of the time. You can't expect to run significantly faster than your training times at an event, unless of course you are not trying 100% in your training runs. It can get as complicated as you want working out schedules, intervals, slow/recovery runs, fast runs, etc but for most working amateurs at least one or two "fast" runs with two or three slow/moderate runs for recovery should be OK. If you do all your runs at 100% effort, you will find your times coming down even as you exhaust yourself and collect injuries - you need time for recovery also.

2. I managed to run sub 45mins for 10km on a training schedule of only three runs a week, 5km, 5km, 8km. I was limited due to coming back from a knee injury. This is only 18km a week. But I did try to push out the 8km run when I felt I could. I chose 8km as the longest run as it was 8/10ths of the event distance I was training for (10km). I figured that the extra 2km would not be a problem to maintain due to the adrenaline of the event, which proved to be the case. An alternate approach might be to make 12km your longest run so that the 10km seems "easier" on the day and you can go even faster. But that means increasing your longest run by 50%, something you will need to consider is it worth it or practical given your circumstances and normal mileage.

3. In terms of weekly mileage, I have read books that claim that middle distance runners produce optimum times with mileage of well over 50km a week - from memory some even state that 100km or so is needed. If you are an ultra serious runner, running 5-6 times a week, with serious ambition to improve your timings, you could consider such approaches. But if, as mentioned above, you are a working amateur with modest timing aspirations who runs mainly to keep fit, such approaches are not practical. Depending on the distance you are training for , you could do quite well training 20 - 40km a week. You need to ask yourself if an extra minute or two is worth doubling your mileage - the law of diminishing returns always applies.

4. I wouldn't worry about comparing your mileage to others in running forums. Everyone has different goals, time limitations and natural abilities. You need to find the mileage that fits in with your work and family commitments and gives you timings that you are happy with. No matter how much you train, you will be limited by your innate physical abilities. Comparing Asians with Caucasians or Kenyans or whatever might be academically interesting, but for practical purposes you have to live with the race and the body you were born with. Every population will have its own average running ability, with its superstars and its underachievers. I think it also depends on culture - in the West, running is more accepted and respected as a sport and you might find a higher proportion of the population doing it. Naturally, this would lead to more "faster" runners, simply because more people are doing it. When I went to New York many years ago, I was amazed at the speed of the "casual" runners in Central Park - it seemed like they were all on steroids! Whether that was a result of culture or genes or higher mileage is for the academics to debate. :)

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The question you should be asking yourself is: what are you running/training for?

If it is just to pass the 2.4km, then you don't need to clock high mileage but if it is to run a marathon, then obviously you need to have a higher per week mileage. Similarly, if your goal is just to keep fit as compared to running a race, then the mileage requirement will be different.

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I've been reading quite a bit on RW forums, and it seems that every single one of them do about at least 30 mpw, which is about 48kmpw. And even then, that is considered super little to them.

My question is, how many of us here actually run so much? And for people who can hit times of sub 45 10k, what is your weekly mileage like? And is it really necessary to run so much in order to improve? Time isn't really on my side and its a bit hard to run that much.

Then again, is it because we think that 30 mpw is too much, hence people here are generally slower than people in like US?

Thanks!

I have a few thoughts on this:

1. Timing is as much a matter of quality of training as it is quantity. Simply put, if you want to run fast in an event, you need to train fast - not all the time but at least some of the time. You can't expect to run significantly faster than your training times at an event, unless of course you are not trying 100% in your training runs. It can get as complicated as you want working out schedules, intervals, slow/recovery runs, fast runs, etc but for most working amateurs at least one or two "fast" runs with two or three slow/moderate runs for recovery should be OK. If you do all your runs at 100% effort, you will find your times coming down even as you exhaust yourself and collect injuries - you need time for recovery also.

2. I managed to run sub 45mins for 10km on a training schedule of only three runs a week, 5km, 5km, 8km. I was limited due to coming back from a knee injury. This is only 18km a week. But I did try to push out the 8km run when I felt I could. I chose 8km as the longest run as it was 8/10ths of the event distance I was training for (10km). I figured that the extra 2km would not be a problem to maintain due to the adrenaline of the event, which proved to be the case. An alternate approach might be to make 12km your longest run so that the 10km seems "easier" on the day and you can go even faster. But that means increasing your longest run by 50%, something you will need to consider is it worth it or practical given your circumstances and normal mileage.

3. In terms of weekly mileage, I have read books that claim that middle distance runners produce optimum times with mileage of well over 50km a week - from memory some even state that 100km or so is needed. If you are an ultra serious runner, running 5-6 times a week, with serious ambition to improve your timings, you could consider such approaches. But if, as mentioned above, you are a working amateur with modest timing aspirations who runs mainly to keep fit, such approaches are not practical. Depending on the distance you are training for , you could do quite well training 20 - 40km a week. You need to ask yourself if an extra minute or two is worth doubling your mileage - the law of diminishing returns always applies.

4. I wouldn't worry about comparing your mileage to others in running forums. Everyone has different goals, time limitations and natural abilities. You need to find the mileage that fits in with your work and family commitments and gives you timings that you are happy with. No matter how much you train, you will be limited by your innate physical abilities. Comparing Asians with Caucasians or Kenyans or whatever might be academically interesting, but for practical purposes you have to live with the race and the body you were born with. Every population will have its own average running ability, with its superstars and its underachievers. I think it also depends on culture - in the West, running is more accepted and respected as a sport and you might find a higher proportion of the population doing it. Naturally, this would lead to more "faster" runners, simply because more people are doing it. When I went to New York many years ago, I was amazed at the speed of the "casual" runners in Central Park - it seemed like they were all on steroids! Whether that was a result of culture or genes or higher mileage is for the academics to debate. :)

Respect! And agree with your post in general.

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I'm not naturally fit like some runners, so I need to work hard to stay in shape. I do about 50-55km per week, excluding speed work. My 10k best is 38min 2sec and my marathon best is 3hr 25min. Some of my friends train a bit more, but have much faster times. Oh well...

Very very respectable 10k & FM times for someone who is not fit...

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I'm not naturally fit like some runners, so I need to work hard to stay in shape. I do about 50-55km per week, excluding speed work. My 10k best is 38min 2sec and my marathon best is 3hr 25min. Some of my friends train a bit more, but have much faster times. Oh well...

Very very respectable 10k & FM times for someone who is not fit...

Absolutely. @Zhuo - WIth a 38 min PR on the 10k, you can go sub 3 for the marathon.

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I'm not naturally fit like some runners, so I need to work hard to stay in shape. I do about 50-55km per week, excluding speed work. My 10k best is 38min 2sec and my marathon best is 3hr 25min. Some of my friends train a bit more, but have much faster times. Oh well...

Very very respectable 10k & FM times for someone who is not fit...

Absolutely. @Zhuo - WIth a 38 min PR on the 10k, you can go sub 3 for the marathon.

Its a goal that I'm working on. I only have done one marathon so far, which was last year, so I suppose my timing cannot be considered a PB since there's nothing to compare with. :blush: I started to cramp up at the 35km mark and had to walk/slow jog the rest of the way. Need to condition my body to get used to the mileage, haha. I believe that its physically possible for most guys to do it, just need lots of patience and hard work.

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Actually you can change the number of red blood cells you have ... by training in high altitude. Thats the remarkable thing about our body, it adapts to the environment. If you can simulate low oxygen environment in our current altitudes and train for a consistent period if time 3-4 weeks or more, you will have more red blood cells. Alternatively, you will find smokers are not able to do this as effectively cos Oxygen intake is limited by effective lung capacity.

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Actually you can change the number of red blood cells you have ... by training in high altitude. Thats the remarkable thing about our body, it adapts to the environment. If you can simulate low oxygen environment in our current altitudes and train for a consistent period if time 3-4 weeks or more, you will have more red blood cells. Alternatively, you will find smokers are not able to do this as effectively cos Oxygen intake is limited by effective lung capacity.

Thanks for the correction, I did a bit of searching and found this useful:

http://www.ehow.com/how_5416655_increase-red-blood-cell-count.html

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Also don't forget the AGE factor :)

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Also don't forget the AGE factor :)

Physically old, young at heart, can?

My weekly mileage is only 20km. 5K x 4 days.

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Wa..I am scared.

I only clocked 30 km per week, 15 km twice a week. Simply don't have time to run that much.

I tried running 19 km yesterday but got punctured badly at 17 (left knee and ankles hurt).

I am wondering how to get fit enough to last the full 42 km!

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Also don't forget the AGE factor :)

Age is just a number. There is a 74 year old who can do a sub 3 hrs marathon. :thumbsup:

http://www.theharrier.com/marcbloomrunning/worldclassrunners/whitlock.php

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Also don't forget the AGE factor :)

Age is just a number. There is a 74 year old who can do a sub 3 hrs marathon. :thumbsup:

http://www.theharrier.com/marcbloomrunning/worldclassrunners/whitlock.php

at this age to do sub-3 is really an exception ... not a norm.

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Age is just a number. There is a 74 year old who can do a sub 3 hrs marathon. :thumbsup:

http://www.theharrier.com/marcbloomrunning/worldclassrunners/whitlock.php

at this age to do sub-3 is really an exception ... not a norm.

Every day, Whitlock, 74, travels farther on foot than many motorists in his town of Milton, Ontario, a Toronto suburb. He trains up to three hours a day, about 23 miles, close to the marathon distance of 26 miles, 385 yards. Most Olympic marathoners do less.

*ouch* a long run everyday, running almost 70 loops around a cemetery each time.

apart from being an exceptional runner, he's also damn persistent! I'll bet he runs without an ipod as well :showoff:

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Age is just a number. There is a 74 year old who can do a sub 3 hrs marathon. :thumbsup:

http://www.theharrier.com/marcbloomrunning/worldclassrunners/whitlock.php

at this age to do sub-3 is really an exception ... not a norm.

Every day, Whitlock, 74, travels farther on foot than many motorists in his town of Milton, Ontario, a Toronto suburb. He trains up to three hours a day, about 23 miles, close to the marathon distance of 26 miles, 385 yards. Most Olympic marathoners do less.

*ouch* a long run everyday, running almost 70 loops around a cemetery each time.

apart from being an exceptional runner, he's also damn persistent! I'll bet he runs without an ipod as well :showoff:

physically, he is awesome for sure and definitely exceptional.

but hey ... at his age, he has plenty of time on his hands (or on his legs), he can run and run and run and run .... so, 70 loops may be 4 loops too little (as compared to his age).

so, he is an outliner ... statistically.

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It seems that most people here have weekly mileage of about 20-40km, as compared to 50 mpw on RW forums. Just a thought, do you think this is why Asians, or Singaporeans in this case, are slower on average as compared to the rest of the world?

Oh and a bit of side track, if say I could do a 22min 5k now doing mostly tempo runs for training, ROUGHLY how much improvement would there be if I did intervals for a couple of weeks?

Thanks for all the replies so far!

I don't think its just about clocking mileage. Could be due to genetics or physiological make up. The average asian is shorter and has more body fat than a caucasian/african. Then there are other factors such as vo2 max, red blood cell count, etc. You can improve vo2 max by training harder, but you cannot change how much red blood cells you have. But there are many asian marathoners who are faster than their caucasian counterparts, and I don't think their weekly mileage differs that much.

There is no 'roughly' when it comes to predicting improvement. Individual performance can vary greatly. This is also further complicated by other factors such as diet, recovery rate, different training style etc. Its hard even to give a general answer to your question as the possibilities are too broad.

Also don't forget the AGE factor :)

Age is just a number. There is a 74 year old who can do a sub 3 hrs marathon. :thumbsup:

http://www.theharrier.com/marcbloomrunning/worldclassrunners/whitlock.php

at this age to do sub-3 is really an exception ... not a norm.

Of course the example I found is an exception. :rolleyes: But my point here is that people shouldn't be overly concerned about age. It should not set the limit on how fast or how slow we become.

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I hardly ever post in these forums but this is a pet topic of mine bcos i have struggled with many queries about mileage myself, and after experimenting on myself over a few years, i feel that i have to post here to clear some misconceptions...

In long distance running, mileage is THE MOST IMPORTANT factor if you want to improve and run faster times. If you are only interested in completing a marathon then u can pretty much stop reading here and stick to your current mileage, beacause in this day and age a person can complete a marathon by walking and without any training at all.

If its performance you want, then its not just the mileage you run but how you run it that matters. The reason the topic starter is so awed by the americans who run 30 miles per week and still think its very little is because of the current mindset among local runners that high mileage is not important. Sadly, running is a sport where there is no room for the lazy on the podium so you cannot expect to get to the podium with a minimalist attitude. This is why the top runners in singapore today are the ones with the highest mileage, and it is also the reason why the same few names are in the top 10 all the time.

30 miles or 48 km is actually quite little believe it or not. The elites in america/kenya/ethiopia run in excess of 100miles(160km) per week. This is why you see americans complaining that they 'only' run 30miles per week on RW forums. This shows that their mindset is totally different from the singaporean mindset. They look at the elites and wonder how they can reach the same standards, while we sit here and say we will never reach those heights. We are happy to watch the elites in singapore win races rather than to try and compete with them. This attitude has gotten us nowhere and hence the dismal state of the local long-distance scene.

Having said all this I must also reiterate that high mileage alone is no guarantee of success. You must also know when to add in speedwork, threshold training and of course, rest. Runningis not an exact science and we all have our limits, but we will not even begin to see the things our bodies are capable of until we remove the barriers in our minds and start running more. Time and age are not valid excuses beacause we all have the same 24hours each day and if you want something you have to be prepared to sacrifice something else. It all depends on how much you really want it.

Please get out there and start running more. Your body can do great things too. I actually have many more things to say but its late and im tired. It must be the mileage... maybe another day.

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    • Wow! Thank you so much i will try it. 
    • I took part as well, wanted to run but I ended up walking 4km instead. Wasn’t really expecting much from a fun run actually...  It’s all about queuing, queue to go start pen, queue to run I mean walk, queue to collect medal, queue to collect free gifts oh well
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