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Half timer

2010 Seoul International Marathon

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Registration now opens till 27 Feb 10 Click Here

you going? i'm still thinking... its a great course... plus nice weather too...

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Just over two weeks to go..

Just want to check whether anyone else has received any emails from the organizer on racepack pick-up details etc? :rolleyes2:

Just in case, the email went to my spam box and got deleted

I haven't received any email since I made the payment but saw that my bib number is already allocated.

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so how was the run for u all?

i'm planning for next year.

and it'll be my first overseas run. so hope to gain some insight from you guys too. :)

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I ran Seoul Marathon last week, hare are my perpsectives:

Weather:

Seoul is cold during March. It was actually snowing a couple of days before and after the marathon. On race day, it was 0c at 8am but the sub-0 windchill made it even much colder. I suggest you get cold-weather running stuffs (gloves, long sleeves etc) and come to Seoul 2-3 days before to acclimatize with the cold conditions.

Organization:

Seoul is classified as IAAF Gold Label Race - same organization standard as the big marathons such as Boston, New York, Berlin, London, Chicago, Tokyo etc. However, this doesn't really apply to us mere mortals. The Gold standard actually refers to prize money, super accurate course distance for world record legitimization etc.

FYI, Singapore Marathon is a silver label race, hence one step below than Seoul.

The registration can be done either on-line or by fax. The fee is KRW 40000 which is about S$50 - considering cheap given some short races in Singapore charge fees around there.

Race pack can be collected a few days before at the organizer office or on the race day itself. Race pack consisted of bib, chip, race guide booklet, and Ascis Seoul Marathon tee.

During registration, you can also submit your previous marathon certificate. Based on these, the organizer will put you in appropriate corrals. For example, my last marathon was 3.04 and they gave me bib # A10389. The A means I am in the A (front) corral for sub 3:20 runners behind the elites.

Race route:

The course is point-to-point, so the start and finish points are different. Wherever you stay are not really a big deal since the subway system in Seoul is first class. The start point is also close to City Hall station where most trains interchange. I personally prefer to start within walking distance from the start and then take the train back.

The startpoint is in front of Gyeobokgung Palace - which is very picturisque due to its mountain backdrop. The first half of the course was through downtown Seoul (north of Han river) and there were bands, dancers, drummers - entertaining the runners.

From the first half to km 30+, the course goes through the eastern suburbs and then finally to the south of Han river, ending up at the 1988 Olympic Stadium (the last 300m is on the track inside stadium)

Km markers are available every km. The organizer in the booklet claims that only 5km markers are IAAF certified and that's where they have timing mats to record your splits.

Course profile is generally flat with a few rises (tunnel, bridge) after the first half. The course is not as pancake flat as Nagano, Gold Coast or Singapore marathons.

Race Atmosphere, Drinks:

Drink stations are available every 5k serving water & pocari. The stations are probably 100m-200m long, so if you cannot find any cups in the first few tables, just continue running for the latter tables. They also have spongsing stations every 5k but who need them when you run at low 0 temp?

Banana and chocolate biscuits are provided at km 30.

There are pacing groups from 2.50 all the way to 5 hours. They wear ballons so you can see them from far,

The cut offtime is 5 hours.

In total,there were 23000 runners from 33 countries participating. Race ambience is very competitive and it is unlikely you will be racing alone. The top male runner finished in 2h06. For me who finished in 3.03, I was only placed in the top 1000 (while in Singapore, probably top 100) which indicates how crazy Korean people about running.

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wah, great description of the event.

and great run.

definitely going to try for it next year n train reigiously.

don't want to end up outside the 5hr mark.

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wah, great description of the event.

and great run.

definitely going to try for it next year n train reigiously.

don't want to end up outside the 5hr mark.

Yeah .. i think i want to run the Seoul Marathon next year too and of course, like you said, need to finish within 5 hours.

Sling - Was it in general easier to run in that weather after you had got sufficiently warmed up compared to Singapore which is so humid?

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by my standard, 3:03 is very impressive already. Congratulations.

that brings me to this thought ... "if you can't swim with the sharks, then stay away from deep water" ... so, I have to kill any idea of going for this marathon in the future.

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Sling - Was it in general easier to run in that weather after you had got sufficiently warmed up compared to Singapore which is so humid?

Yes, it is easier running in cold weather in terms of effort because the heart does not have to work as hard. In warm conditions, the blood goes to the skin for colling, hence, it will reduce the blood volume that goes to working muscles. In cold weather, the muscles do not need to compete much with the skin because you don't sweat a lot.

One issue is that it is very difficult to get you muscles warmed up at the start. You can't do a long warm up like for short races becoz it will burn some fuel that your body needs to last the marathon distance. Waiting at the start line at 0c with wind-chill wasn't fun at all. Therefore, I suggest you bring old sweater/jacket and wear that until the start or even for a few a kms. Once you are warmed up, then just throw it away.

However, I think Seoul is a tad too cold for us who live in tropical weather. Personally, around 10c is the most perfect running temperature. Gebrelassie always chooses Berlin becoz of the flat course and also the 10c weather. Also, both world marathon records for both men and women were done at 10c temp.

In the region, the two flat marathons that offer perfect 10c weather are Nagano in April and Gold Coast in July. The rest of marathons in Korea, Japan, and Australia have too unpredictable weather (e.g. Tokyo in Feb was supposed to be great but it turned out to be snowy and raining). Chiang Mai has cool weather too, but I heard a lot of rumour that the distance is not accurate.

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sling, check with you, the long sleeves you mentioned.

were they the types we usually see soccer players wear inside during winter?

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Gibson - for running, I'd use running long-sleeve shirt for its moisture management properties. I think major brands such as Nike, Adidas should have one. Or you can try skins or 2xu. But you can also wear a cotton one or anything you like if you are comfortable in them and have used them in training.

I also notice some people use running jacket or light windcheater. You can wear this as well if it is extremely cold.

What I'd do is to check the temperature range forecast 1-2 days before. If 0c is the max, then jacket or thick long sleeve + long tight is probably they way to go. If it is like my race last week betwee 0-5c, then long sleeve + shorts will do. If it is 10c, then tee + shorts are okay.

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Sling - Was it in general easier to run in that weather after you had got sufficiently warmed up compared to Singapore which is so humid?

Yes, it is easier running in cold weather in terms of effort because the heart does not have to work as hard. In warm conditions, the blood goes to the skin for colling, hence, it will reduce the blood volume that goes to working muscles. In cold weather, the muscles do not need to compete much with the skin because you don't sweat a lot.

One issue is that it is very difficult to get you muscles warmed up at the start. You can't do a long warm up like for short races becoz it will burn some fuel that your body needs to last the marathon distance. Waiting at the start line at 0c with wind-chill wasn't fun at all. Therefore, I suggest you bring old sweater/jacket and wear that until the start or even for a few a kms. Once you are warmed up, then just throw it away.

However, I think Seoul is a tad too cold for us who live in tropical weather. Personally, around 10c is the most perfect running temperature. Gebrelassie always chooses Berlin becoz of the flat course and also the 10c weather. Also, both world marathon records for both men and women were done at 10c temp.

In the region, the two flat marathons that offer perfect 10c weather are Nagano in April and Gold Coast in July. The rest of marathons in Korea, Japan, and Australia have too unpredictable weather (e.g. Tokyo in Feb was supposed to be great but it turned out to be snowy and raining). Chiang Mai has cool weather too, but I heard a lot of rumour that the distance is not accurate.

Thanks for this - truly informative post!

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Sling - Was it in general easier to run in that weather after you had got sufficiently warmed up compared to Singapore which is so humid?

Yes, it is easier running in cold weather in terms of effort because the heart does not have to work as hard. In warm conditions, the blood goes to the skin for colling, hence, it will reduce the blood volume that goes to working muscles. In cold weather, the muscles do not need to compete much with the skin because you don't sweat a lot.

One issue is that it is very difficult to get you muscles warmed up at the start. You can't do a long warm up like for short races becoz it will burn some fuel that your body needs to last the marathon distance. Waiting at the start line at 0c with wind-chill wasn't fun at all. Therefore, I suggest you bring old sweater/jacket and wear that until the start or even for a few a kms. Once you are warmed up, then just throw it away.

However, I think Seoul is a tad too cold for us who live in tropical weather. Personally, around 10c is the most perfect running temperature. Gebrelassie always chooses Berlin becoz of the flat course and also the 10c weather. Also, both world marathon records for both men and women were done at 10c temp.

In the region, the two flat marathons that offer perfect 10c weather are Nagano in April and Gold Coast in July. The rest of marathons in Korea, Japan, and Australia have too unpredictable weather (e.g. Tokyo in Feb was supposed to be great but it turned out to be snowy and raining). Chiang Mai has cool weather too, but I heard a lot of rumour that the distance is not accurate.

Thanks for this - truly informative post!

it depends on individual i think... for me, running at 10 deg cel is not good enough... seoul, tokyo, milan and copenhagen are perfect cos they are between 2 deg c and 4 deg c... that's for running... after completing, certainly must bring extra close to wear... otherwise, can freezed... but if it rains, it would be a different story...

anyway, i can't remember did sling mentioned about the coral start... meaning, those in A would start first... after the last runners cleared off, then they flagged off those in the B corals... etc... i was in the E coral in 2009 and i waited 25mins before being flagged off... i'm not sure if the course/race is closed based on gun-to-gun timing (cos some races are like Comrades, Two Oceans) as i was still able to complete within the 5 hours based on actual flag-off time for the A corals runners... you may also read the race review i did for the 2009 race as additional info...

http://www.sgrunners.com/forum//index.php?showtopic=10915

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Sling - Was it in general easier to run in that weather after you had got sufficiently warmed up compared to Singapore which is so humid?

Yes, it is easier running in cold weather in terms of effort because the heart does not have to work as hard. In warm conditions, the blood goes to the skin for colling, hence, it will reduce the blood volume that goes to working muscles. In cold weather, the muscles do not need to compete much with the skin because you don't sweat a lot.

One issue is that it is very difficult to get you muscles warmed up at the start. You can't do a long warm up like for short races becoz it will burn some fuel that your body needs to last the marathon distance. Waiting at the start line at 0c with wind-chill wasn't fun at all. Therefore, I suggest you bring old sweater/jacket and wear that until the start or even for a few a kms. Once you are warmed up, then just throw it away.

However, I think Seoul is a tad too cold for us who live in tropical weather. Personally, around 10c is the most perfect running temperature. Gebrelassie always chooses Berlin becoz of the flat course and also the 10c weather. Also, both world marathon records for both men and women were done at 10c temp.

In the region, the two flat marathons that offer perfect 10c weather are Nagano in April and Gold Coast in July. The rest of marathons in Korea, Japan, and Australia have too unpredictable weather (e.g. Tokyo in Feb was supposed to be great but it turned out to be snowy and raining). Chiang Mai has cool weather too, but I heard a lot of rumour that the distance is not accurate.

Thanks for this - truly informative post!

it depends on individual i think... for me, running at 10 deg cel is not good enough... seoul, tokyo, milan and copenhagen are perfect cos they are between 2 deg c and 4 deg c... that's for running... after completing, certainly must bring extra close to wear... otherwise, can freezed... but if it rains, it would be a different story...

anyway, i can't remember did sling mentioned about the coral start... meaning, those in A would start first... after the last runners cleared off, then they flagged off those in the B corals... etc... i was in the E coral in 2009 and i waited 25mins before being flagged off... i'm not sure if the course/race is closed based on gun-to-gun timing (cos some races are like Comrades, Two Oceans) as i was still able to complete within the 5 hours based on actual flag-off time for the A corals runners... you may also read the race review i did for the 2009 race as additional info...

http://www.sgrunners.com/forum//index.php?showtopic=10915

wah, thanks for the great info.

i'm really gearing myself towards this next year as part of my holiday as well.

but hmmm... i'm a bit worried about the 5hrs limit.

because I'm only running my first 42k on Sundown. Not sure what's my standard yet, lol.

but will see how it goes, then add a SCSM at year end to see how much I improve before deciding to register in Dec.

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wah, thanks for the great info.

i'm really gearing myself towards this next year as part of my holiday as well.

but hmmm... i'm a bit worried about the 5hrs limit.

because I'm only running my first 42k on Sundown. Not sure what's my standard yet, lol.

but will see how it goes, then add a SCSM at year end to see how much I improve before deciding to register in Dec.

i remembered the website is difficult to register... so you can drop them an email... they respond to queries rather fast...

all the best to your SD42km and SCSM...

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wah, thanks for the great info.

i'm really gearing myself towards this next year as part of my holiday as well.

but hmmm... i'm a bit worried about the 5hrs limit.

because I'm only running my first 42k on Sundown. Not sure what's my standard yet, lol.

but will see how it goes, then add a SCSM at year end to see how much I improve before deciding to register in Dec.

i remembered the website is difficult to register... so you can drop them an email... they respond to queries rather fast...

all the best to your SD42km and SCSM...

ok, thanks.

registering wise i'm not worried.

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